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Gear Advice Best inexpensive Lighting?

Paddle & hike

Active Member
TubeBuddy User
I found a light 10" ring + tripod set that works super well...3 diff type of lighting (warm,day,cool) and 10 brightness levels . You can mount a cell or a camera on it too... The tripod is very light for it's size.
Working great for me.
Here's a link: [no affiliate link]
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Last edited by a moderator:

Kaos71

New Member
SIAP, but I use two Lume Cube panel minis... have them on little Neewer light stands that I put on my table to cast some very good light when I am doing set pieces at my desk. I have one that sits on my camera when I go out in the field.


I also have several of the Lume Cube 2.0s with modifiers when I need to do something a little more artistic.

When I am doing a full shoot and need a lot more light, I have a couple of ProMaster light wands... they were more pricy than anything that I wanted to get but I negotiated with a commercial shoot that I was doing to purchase those for me as part of my compensation. They have been great and I still take them out in the field for set pieces.
 

EnglishwithLiz

Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
111
11
My set up for my 1 to 1 teaching videos (lighting requirements will change with the type of video you shoot) is a Neewer ring lite and two 660 LED Panels. The ring light is great but the 660's are only OK because the plastic diffusers are not great. I am saving up for a monolight with a large diffuser that will be set right above my camera as I believe this will give a better look than the ring that can be harsh.
Also experimented with wearing glasses that makes it a no no for the ring light. For this I set both 660's, with white silk draped over for better diffusion, at either side of me, probably at about 20 degrees, lights just out of camera and then used the ring light to light a white ceiling above me by bouncing the light off it. Results not bad but tend to prefer the first set up as it gets rid of more wrinkles :)
 

MyBlocksStrongestMan

Recognized Member
91
8
What is the best inexpensive lighting when you are just getting started working with lighting? I have a beauty light ring that I use sometimes. But I'm thinking of something that I can put on either side of the camera to make better lighting. But have no clue where to start on what to get.
Hi, I'm by no means an expert in this area, but I've used a setup like the following (my affiliate link) which has made a big difference in replacing my yellow looking office lights with a much more natural look. https://amzn.to/3lkpTbW
 

SILTHW

DecoratedPoster
TubeBuddy Star
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Wanted to do some poking around on this since it is asked a lot. It felt like their was a way to blend the old "guerrilla filming" techniques with newer technology. So here is what I'm thinking for indoor, small setups:
- Wyze Bulb - 4 Pack - $29.99. This gets you 4 smart bulbs that have adjustable color temp and are "smart" bulbs. Down side is they are only 60w equivalents. This shouldn't matter if shooting indoors. Available at wyze.com
- Clamped work lights. $6.00 each x 4. So $24. Available at any hardware store.
- Diffuser Fabric - wehther the neewer 2 yards of fabric ($21) or the Fotoconic socks ($28). Available on Amazon.

So now you have a functional 4-light setup for ~ US$86. And it is remote controllable.

Now should I make a video on this? :)
 

Stanley Orchard

Moderator
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I am as cheap as it comes to stuff like this. I sit by a window and I use a floor lamp. On one particularly frisky night when I felt like livestreaming I splurged on a pair of $5 can lights from Home Depot. Been using that set up for three years now.
 

Randomlifestylevlog

Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
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Get a set of soft lamps of amazon and a ring light. Focus on positioning these to reduce as many shadows as possible and you should be good. Take your environment into account as well.