Opinion The Benefits Of Failure

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by xingcat, Sep 11, 2017.

  1. xingcat

    xingcat Member Member of the Month

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    [​IMG]

    There’s an old adage that goes something like, “What would you do, if you knew you couldn’t fail?” It’s a great exercise in thinking big, in deciding on paths that may be frightening due to the risk involved in trying them out, or in finding solutions that may be held back due to overthinking the pitfalls.

    However, in many creative pursuits, the definition of “success” or “failure” tends to be expressed in only one way: monetary compensation. How many times have we, as creatives, listened to others as they questioned every moment spent on artistic pursuits?

    “How much do you get per video you upload?”

    “Have you sold a book yet?”

    “Do people actually pay for your paintings?”

    [​IMG]

    Certainly, it’s the goal of many artists to support ourselves financially through our art. However, the marketplace being what it is and daily life being as expensive as it can be, that’s not always possible. Sadly, this tends to lead a lot of creatives to giving up on our dreams, since any time and energy spent on the work that moves us is considered frivolous, or worse, that horribly dismissive term, “hobby.”

    But what else do we gain from creative work, beyond a paycheck? Is there value in failing to make a living wage from art that fills something else in us that makes the hours of work worthwhile? What would you do, if you knew you couldn’t succeed financially from your artistic pursuits?

    In a way, it can be seen as a freeing experience. If you aren’t expecting to land a publishing deal, how experimental can your next novel be? If you don’t worry about your subscriber count, can you be entirely personal and more specific with the videos you produce? If the sculpture you’re carving will only live in your garden, couldn’t you make it something that inspires you every day?

    With more and more opportunities to build a career out of self-directed creative work, it almost seems shameful these days to say that we make things “just” because of the love we have for the work itself. But working on something simply to pay the bills can often dull the shine of it, and when we’re beholden to an audience, customers, or patrons, we often don’t have full autonomy over the work we produce.

    It’s not necessary to give up on the dream of building a creative career, but remember that it’s not the only goal available.

    Go out and fail spectacularly.
     


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  2. markhascole

    markhascole New User

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    failure-is-not-the-opposite-of-success-its-part-of-success-quote-1.jpg
    People love success stories, however, freak out at the prospect of failure. If you wish success in any side of your life, then you have got to embrace failure and turn on the advantages it generates.

    There square measure four keys to unlocking the advantages of failure. Mastering these four can yield five significant advantages

    I had faced many failures when I was creating my youtube channal because I am the citizen of honking and youtube is not accessible in Hongkong and unblock youtube the toughest thing because it is only possible with VPN and Chinese government blocks most of the VPNs. But finally, 1 excellent article helps me a lot!

    I learned a lot from my failures:)
     


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  3. Draconicrose

    Draconicrose Newbie Member

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    Unfortunately, this is nothing but a wishful thinking exercise while the world is ran by capitalism and the necessity to use money for stuff. Kind of hard to be creative if you're starving and in the dark.
     


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  4. xingcat

    xingcat Member Member of the Month

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    If all you're doing all day every day is slaving away for a paycheck, then what is it worth to you? And if that's the case, then YouTube is possibly one of the worst things anyone could be doing, since it's so high-risk, little-reward for most. There has to be something beyond just the pennies most creators will get to keep them going, but if you don't agree, that's your prerogative, I suppose.
     


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  5. DragoNate

    DragoNate Well-Known Member TubeBuddy Star

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    (sorry in advance for long post)
    I really like this post, it's one that makes you think.
    When it comes to failure vs success, I'm of the mindset that failure doesn't exist unless you let it. Only setbacks. A pastor whose sermon I watched one time mentioned that "Failure removes the possibility of success. But if you fall, you can get back up and try again." Since then, I personally equate failure to giving up.

    Art and creation and the like is all similar, but each one has it's differences, like dancing vs painting. I have done parkour for 3 years now. When I first started, I was terrible, but I loved what I was doing and what I was learning. I never really had the thought of making money from it in some way. After about a year, maybe less, people would constantly ask if I'm a trainer at the gym I train at and I'd say no. They'd ask if I'd want to be and I'd always say it would be cool to. What I found I loved the most was helping others to improve their skills. There's always kids at the gym, and kids always want to get to a higher level (the gym has a grading/level system so classes can be more organized and structured) so sometimes kids would ask me for help with something specific, or I'd see them struggling, so I'd help them, and it would end up with me grabbing the grading sheet and going through each skill to get them ready for their grading day.

    Now, I actually teach it, and I do get paid to. It may not be a lot of money, nor is it a lot of hours teaching, but I love it. I love making things fun for them, giving them challenges, asking questions to see their answers, making them think. I love seeing their smiles when I demonstrate a skill that think is super amazing, or when they're excited because they did a skill successfully and it felt good. I love it when they ask questions, even silly ones like "Are you a parkour master?" The money, honestly, is an added bonus.

    With YouTube, live streaming is my favorite part because I get to interact with my audience live, see their reactions to things that happen and such. One of my favorites was when I was live streaming Prince of Persia Forgotten Sands, there's a really difficult part close to the end where you have time everything right, pressing certain buttons in the right order, making sure the prince doesn't go too far or too high or whatever else (hard to explain, sorry to the non-gamers :p ) and I took about 10 seconds to think about it before I did it (if you die, you have to start back a little bit) and then I did it, and got through it perfectly first try! (I died quickly afterward, right before the checkpoint -.- )
    One of the people watching was like
    O . o What?! Nate, how???
    They were amazed I did it first try! Their reaction was the best! Unfortunately, I proceeded to keep failing it for the next 10 minutes afterward... 1st try was best try...
     


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  6. Draconicrose

    Draconicrose Newbie Member

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    Of course there is something beyond just the pennies, but it's always tempered by the necessity to make money. I don't think it helps anyone to think otherwise. There is the art side and there is the business side and they influence each other.
     


  7. Paul

    Paul Member TubeBuddy Pro

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    I learned along time ago that Failure = Experience in something that you can learn from and build upon. Nothing wrong with failing...
    Reminds me of a quot I heard years ago from Thomas Edison about the trials of inventing the light bulb: Thomas A. Edison “I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.”
     


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