Seeking Advice Growing with evergreen content.

Discussion in 'Content Strategies' started by Ceorge_Christofi, May 19, 2018.

  1. Ceorge_Christofi

    Ceorge_Christofi Member TubeBuddy Star

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    Hi all.

    Everywhere I go, every podcast, every tip video and every other YouTube expert is always saying that 'the first 3 days are the most important' for every video.

    In my case, I have to say that this is pretty much crap.

    My channel, along with those I follow regularly deals with old stuff. Old radios, old cars. My current video series is based around a radio built in 1949. Nearly 70 years old. The video content will be valid for the next 70 years so has absolutely no time critical impact point, relates nothing to current politics or celebrity news, isn't tied to the latest game or film.

    My question therefore is more one of getting people on board who maybe might like to learn stuff about old things. I get the thumbnail thing, I get the consistency thing, the upload regularly, improve video quality/sound quality.

    How does a channel like mine grow (apart from slowly!) when it consists of content that is usually anywhere between 15 minutes and an hour long and doesn't really relate to the youth market?
    Any suggestions gratefully received, by all means have a look at the channel and the style of things and tell me how I can make this better for a wider audience.
     


    Last edited: May 19, 2018
  2. kunicross

    kunicross Active Member

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    You are absolutely right - what they see is the usual curve - for a channel with a high subscriber count its usually that way that a video gets most of its views within the first few days and then views do drop off a lot.

    But then there are videos like this one on my secondary channel:

    Screenshot_20180520-163151.png

    I would say most tutorial kind of video especially from a smaller channel will rather look that way or similar.
    In the end it depends mostly on the type and topic of video - having a true evergreen video is somewhat of a holy grail but difficult (and in your case probably does require a lot of endurance)
     


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  3. Ceorge_Christofi

    Ceorge_Christofi Member TubeBuddy Star

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    it does seem strange that most experts focus on the sort of channel that is topical or has information with a short lifespan. I know that in the next 20 or so years there will be very few of us left that can take electronic things apart and actually fix them. Not just replace broken with new but actually fix things. I would dearly love to pass on my skills which is one reason I make videos. If I did it for money I'd have gone bust. I like to think that my content will be valid for at least until the laws of physics change and we stop using all forms of radio (cellphones included). In some ways preppers have it right, learn the skills to survive and rebuild. Unfortunately most of the mobile zombies we call teenagers will probably need counselling and therapy if the cell networks fail.

    I'm not going to lie, if I could grow my channel to a point where it pays a liveable income then I would be really happy but it seems that as the rules change and favour the large and dare I say it, inane content it will never happen for any of us in the niche zones. I play with technology that died out and was replaced in the late 60's. Yes its old, but it works. The only thing that actually changed was things got smaller, cheaper, faster and replaced manufacturing intensive products. Hell, I was repairing Motorola 8000 phones before a lot of YouTubers were born! Even today, your phone breaks, its assembly changes, not real fixes. That or you throw it away and get new. How many people on here have an old cellphone sitting in a draw? I know I have half a dozen of the things kicking around. Now we live in a throw away society maybe people like me are obsolete....

    Ok Ranting over... An open request to the Tube experts. Apart from the usual subjects such as thumbnails, current topics, branding etc, can someone give us niche channels dealing with odd subjects a strategy. We are not mainstream, we are the oldies, the bygones, the days gone by, the forgotten skills.

    Am I just kicking off or do I have a valid point?
     


  4. kunicross

    kunicross Active Member

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    Well in therory if you solider on long enough your channel might turn profitable - just these weeks I came around 2 kinda similar channels: Louis Rossman (professional apple logic board repairman with 400k subs life streaming board repairs and such) and Technology Connections (explaining old tech like cassettes and such 130k subs) so looking at somewhat similar channels might be a good way to learn a bit.

    There is always a bit of interest in obsolete technology.
    And DIY and how to fix stuff is actually not as over saturated with real quality content as many other topics and probably will get more and more important.

    I think a good thing might be to start with the basics - like how to solder, which equipment you need etc. And use the radio as an example / follow up.

    One thing I also try is - whenever I fix some problem or thing I try to record that because if I have the problem and solved it chances are other people encounter it at well. (obviously I haven't been really fixing much recently or had the kids running around me screaming while doing so which makes filming a bit difficult)

    Sharing and preserving skills & knowledge will get more important on YouTube and in general since much stuff can be teached easier via video then with just a book. (my aerospace workplace did recently started doing video instructions on how to place parts in machines and such)
     


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  5. Jimmi Ellis

    Jimmi Ellis Newbie Member

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    Hi Ceorge_Christofi,

    The first 24 to 72 hours of the video being uploaded and traffic refers to helping to ‘rank’ long term. So sharing on social sites, facebook, forums, groups and places where it’s applicable or others are likely to like the content will help.

    Then after things settle for the next couple weeks the algorithms checking out watchtime, retention etc.

    That’s where pattern interrupts, camera changes, exploding circuits from the radios you fix..
    Helps to keep peeps attention and watching.


    I’m not a techie.. I can’t fix crap and am glad guys like you exist. Actually I think it’s a travesty we throw perfectly great TV’s and electronics and bury them in the landfill. Those and other things… anyway..

    I don’t know your niche but are there others in the same or very similar niche as you? How are their channels performing if so.

    Use TubeBuddy for intel. If there’s nobody or if there are but the channels have been around a long time and they have little subscribers, comments etc… you may want to niche down.. Go deeper into a more specific subniche or fixing one particular ‘older’ electronic or thing that people do want to know about.

    Use free keyword tools to get some ideas and then take to TubeBuddy if needed to look further into it.

    Bottom line is.. With everything, unless you just want a hobby and don’t want to monetize, and there’s nothing wrong with that, it could really build but it’s gonna take a good amount of time to develop.

    I have many personal interest, almost too many, but my time I value. Unless I can monetize in some way, I’m not going to produce content or share my wisdom if others see no value in it or they at least don’t take the info and actually apply or benefit from it.

    That’s just me.

    Unfortunately folks these days, myself included, have such short attention spans. I believe I’d chunk down your videos and really plan them out. Take one concept or technique of fixit idea and do your best to condense it. Get good at editing, even if choppy.. You’ll get better in time if editings not your thing.

    My Secret Radio Station Content Formula

    I became a radio disc jockey on a top 40 music station when I was 16 and was in radio for many years.

    My mentor taught me something that’s stayed with me all these years and I believe it fully applies to creating content of almost any kind.

    One day while he was on air and standing in front of the old Harris radio console with huge door knob looking volume pots, maybe you’ve even worked on them, Richard said to me…

    Brevity + Pace = Excitement

    All the best on your projects and your channel!

    Jimmi
     


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  6. Damon

    Damon Well-Known Member TubeBuddy User

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    Yeah, like for me I'm getting into old camera lenses. That same thing. These lenses are older than me. They have been building traffic all that time across several mediums and distribution platforms dating back to the day they were made. So reviewing old stuff gives you an advantage if you ask me.
     


    Last edited: May 23, 2018
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  7. Ceorge_Christofi

    Ceorge_Christofi Member TubeBuddy Star

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    Lois is great. His forte is ranting about apple and their restrictive practices. The actual fixes are a sideline really. Still interesting though. I think he has the following because of the prevalence of the type of stuff he fixes. A lot of people have bought that stuff so have a vested interest in keeping it running

    I actually did a series of basic videos but they seem to not get the views that I hoped. It might be time for a revamp and a new series!!

    I actually did one of those last night. A 10 minute short about old potentiometers! That will be going up soon.
    I actually learn stuff outside my own field by watchting youtube these days. Before we had internet capable of streaming video (i remember 2400 bps dial up) I would either get a book or wing it... now I can just follow someone who has done it already.


    Ahh ok, so the release time generates the average long term ranking and effectively, the amount of recommended by youtube instances you get with it. I share on social media, facebook, twitter, google+ but the majority of my own social circle are not technical. My main day job is actually moving semi-trailers or driving semi rigs because the money in the UK was better and you tend to have to deal less with office politics and the usual crap that goes with it.
    Pattern interrupts.. not a fan, I tend to keep to simple crossfade. Camera changes.. I have just bought a second camera for just that reason, so that if my fingers obscure one view, I can switch to the other. Exploding circuits... very rarely, so rare I think I only had that happen once. I'm not electroboom!


    My niche is vintage radios. Repair of the electronics. I do other stuff like build guitar amps, effects pedals and all sorts of basic Chinese kits that cost less than a couple of dollars. I fix things that I find in dumpsters or at the side of the street. Most of the channels I follow in my niche are in the 300-3000 subscriber range. Some of the other channels are in the 9k-20k range. Only two channels that are not directly in my field but make what I consider enjoyable content only 1 has reaked over 120k subs, the other is at 50k subs.

    I am going deeper into the vintage radio niche at the moment, where the subscriber count is in the hundreds for pretty much most channels. Partly because I can, partly because I see how much of a limited amount of content there is and I'm trying to bring into the area some high visual quality and high information quality content.

    And I like that honesty. I would monetize but still have no idea in what way I could do that. I could offer a training course but I would have to give people a great reason to choose me over an established channel like Mr Carlsons Lab. To do that would require a big input of content but it could then be recycled over and over. Its certainly a thought.
    I also could say motivation isn't always there... but that relates to my health which I have yet to bring up in videos or other social media for fear of the 'your saying that for sympathy' reaction.

    Planning is a failing of mine, I accept that. I start work and get lost in the pleasure of doing what I love, forgetting about the camera and the time passing. My recording sessions usually start after midnight when everyone goes to bed so a) I can work in peace and b) so I don't have to filter out family noise or move mics and lighting so the wife can go for a smoke outside. (my bench shares the family dining room and access to the rear garden). Many a sunrise I have seen after getting filming done!

    Editing is getting harsher. Before I would almost put up as filmed, now I chop out a fair bit and jump forward a lot. I probably need to get even harder on myself but trying not to take away technical explanations.

    Monetisation is a nice to have. I'm looking at Amazon links, but don't really want every posting to be a list of gear bought from amazon because in all honesty, a lot of it will never be had from amazon. I built some of it because health and safety regulations won't allow anyone to sell high voltage gear with the ability to kill for general release. Other stuff gets built from junk that I collect over the years and turn into something useful.

    I was never a top 40 person. I was the laid back rock dj. I was the one with the weekly world news stories. Classic rock is just that, classic. The hardest part is to find decent segue info to link tracks or to find 2 or 3 back to backs. Nowadays the UK radio industry is 3 main companies, national broadcasting from a shared studio in london using a shared mp3 database. I had put my own records on the turntables and cue up a turn and a quarter back.

    Thanks for your input, you have given me some things to think about.

    It's a fascinating thing, looking back at older technologies. The engineering in old radios is geared more to durability than mechanical assembly and mass production. I imaging you have the same with lenses. It isn't so much that they are old, but that they are not push one button and its all done, you have to know what each setting does and how it relates to the final outcome. With photography I would only describe myself as a knowledgeable amateur, getting it wrong still quite a lot. Those guys who can pick up an old 35mm slr, set up a shot on a lens on the fly and get a great image... Kudos. I am going to check out your channel for sure, that stuff really does sound great.
     


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  8. Paul

    Paul Well-Known Member TubeBuddy Pro

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    My best advice for you @Ceorge_Christofi is to change up your thumbnails to and action shot of you or your hands working on whatever piece of equipment you're working on in the video, with only your branded logo on it. Right now pretty much all of your thumbnails look the same except for the text. Trust me on this. I did just that on my diy drywall how to channel and it helped gain me 10,000 subs in just 5 months.

    georges-workbench.PNG

    georges-workbench-tags.PNG

    Then, I would mention your exact title at the beginning of the video and put that at the beginning of your description and make that a tag as well. I'd also break that title down into tags.that make sense like: (don't use capitals or periods in your tags)
    1) jonell 1949 tabletop radio restore an old john lewis radio pt 2
    2) jonell 1949 tabletop radio restore an old john jewis radio
    3) jonell 1949 tabletop radio restore
    4) restore an old john lewis radio
    5) old john lewis radio restore

    I hope this helps, -Paul
     


    Last edited: Jun 6, 2018
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  9. Ceorge_Christofi

    Ceorge_Christofi Member TubeBuddy Star

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    Many Thanks for the feedback and taking the time to look at the details.

    The thumbnails were a sort of consistency thing, the branding being me and the bench but I do take your point. Its quite conflicting because in the beginning I did have action shot thumbnails and all the advice was to 'have a consistent thumbnail' In the latest video I am actually trying out a new intro pic (I'm actually laughing!) and running a title at the bottom which could easily be converted to a thumbnail. Consensus from my teenage daughters is that the new pic is much better than my current one.

    I have seen in my niche that some do no thumbnail, some do the same as me and others do the same thumbnail per series. I went with the standard thumbnail after a bit of advice from one of the Tubebuddy podcasts that said that people were more likely to click in the up next column if they saw that you had a consistent thumbnail. I probably misinterpreted it as usual! I'll certainly be looking at mixing it up a bit as you say, although action shots are pretty much the same with a soldering iron!

    Tagging, I get you there entirely. My first videos when I started were all one word tags and I went on to the multiword tags. I can see where you are going in your example and did try that a few times but after using the tag explore tools it came back with not worth tagging as there were no searches which is why I have been using most of the title as a primary tag and then following up with niche relevant tags, such as tube radio restore, 1949 radio restore, repair old radio, etc. It certainly wont hurt to try it again, its not costing anything. I also can imagine that as each video is part of a series set I can probably be a bit more flexible in the tagging. I did ask a question on here and have had zero replies since the 25th May about series titles so it seems like something that nobody has an answer to! https://community.tubebuddy.com/ind...es-titles-change-them-up-or-leave-them.13867/

    I'll give the tagging a go from the next upload (probably today for release friday) and work on some variations for thumbnails. The one thing I won't be doing is the silly face on a plain background thing.. That just isn't a thing in my niche, regardless of how cool or hip or trendy it is in the vlogging genre. Us electronics guys really are not made for that sort of image!

    Again, many many thanks for your feedback, it has given me some ideas on things to try and move up on.

    George
     


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  10. Paul

    Paul Well-Known Member TubeBuddy Pro

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    No problem George. Happy to help!

    I get you on the boring old solder gun. How about a photo of the beautifuly finished restored radio with your hand do the finish touches. Zoom in a little, bring up the saturation and brightness of the image. Again, keep the thumbnails branded with your logo on all of them.

    I’ll checkout your series playlist thread. I have some series playlists that are doing pretty good. I’ll post what has worked for me and some examples. -Paul
     


  11. Ceorge_Christofi

    Ceorge_Christofi Member TubeBuddy Star

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    Thats certainly an image I can use as a last in series shot, along with the before picture as the first in series. I have just uploaded the latest episode as a scheduled video for friday with a new thumbnail.I have also just realised that I have to change the channel icon too because it no longer matches! Not a big issue though.

    It was a strange question I guess regarding series playlist titles, I'm not sure how many people here do series on a single 'job'? Even my basics series were different items, different topics grouped together but they are not all of the same job, just small basics.

    Again, thanks for your time.
    George
     


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  12. Buddy Shearer

    Buddy Shearer Newbie Member TubeBuddy User

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    I'll chime in here. My channel is about a software platform that is still being used but has not been updated in a few years. How I have 1,300+ subscribers is beyond me. I just lost 2 since yesterday but in a week I will likely gain a couple back.

    I am fortunate in that my video deals with certain commands & functions so my retention rates are not too shabby. The views are consistent which is good.

    While I know it will never garner thousands of subscribers my goal is to have more training videos than the owner of the software platform along with more views. It maybe a misplaced hope but I would love to be the #1 affiliate for this product.

    So I say carry on and just have fun with it.

    Buddy
     


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  13. Ceorge_Christofi

    Ceorge_Christofi Member TubeBuddy Star

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    Many thanks for the encouragement Buddy. As a guy who worked with someone who bought the rights to an old home computer and turned it into a cheap weather station for third world airfield use I know a bit about obsolete software. I never really got the hang of cp/m myself....
     


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  14. Buddy Shearer

    Buddy Shearer Newbie Member TubeBuddy User

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    WOW George! CP/M that is definitely a blast from the past.

    Buddy
     


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