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Video Review Is this video engaging?

Stanley | Team TB

Amazingly Decent and Not-At-All Terrible Fishing
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I LOVE the research you put into this. There is a LOT of value in well-scripted videos like this. In my experience they often take some time to start performing in Search... but when they do they are often channel drivers.

You did a lot of things right; you immersed the viewer with multiple visual elements. In particular I like how you decided to throw the image of the Jackson on screen while describing their differences; little things like that go a long way in the format of visual storytelling and you made some real good decisions.

I am going to be critical of a couple things though. There are some things that could use some improvement. Let's compare your presentation against one that the BBC did...

1648484079081.png


You are using the approach of talking directly into the camera... there is nothing wrong with this (I use a similar approach for presentation style videos). As a note be mindful that when you do this you are only talking to a single person. Cater your speech to the individual watching your video. There is no group of subscribers on the couch huddled around their phone. It's one person; treat the viewer as such.

Your style though is a little bland. Though minimal, can you see the difference in the lighting that the BBC is using in their shots? They are setting up lights specifically to shine a light of the bald parts of these guys heads (I am not even kidding). They are seating them in such a way so that the lighted parts of their faces are contrasting against the darker backgrounds. They seated these guys in a way that causes the lines of the windows and angles of the walls to draw the eye towards them as a focal point of the shot. They also Switch up the focus and zoom in on these guys as they are talking. I would highly encourage you to add this knowledge to your presentation.

Watch Nick Nimmin. He does this straight-to-the-camera style presentation. He is bouncing all over the place when he talks. It creates movement and action. You don't need your footage to look like a rave at Club 54... but a little activity in the shot to help keep interest will help video performance. I would suggest zooming in/out of some of your clips to help with this, and I would HIGHLY advise you go to Home Depot/WalMart/Sutherlands and get 2-3 super-cheap can construction lights and some super cheap, low-intensity light bulbs to 'paint your set.' Spend a little time creating a more complex, intriguing visual presentation to add to your solid script work, editing and story-telling. There are a ton of videos out there on beginner lighting tricks that when combined with some simple editing and movement will likely provide a significant upstroke in your overall video performance.

You are skilled and you are talented... might as well bring the set design up to your caliber of video!
 
OP
OP
Theory Guitar

Theory Guitar

Guitarist and YouTube Enthusiast
TubeBuddy User
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I LOVE the research you put into this. There is a LOT of value in well-scripted videos like this. In my experience they often take some time to start performing in Search... but when they do they are often channel drivers.

You did a lot of things right; you immersed the viewer with multiple visual elements. In particular I like how you decided to throw the image of the Jackson on screen while describing their differences; little things like that go a long way in the format of visual storytelling and you made some real good decisions.

I am going to be critical of a couple things though. There are some things that could use some improvement. Let's compare your presentation against one that the BBC did...

View attachment 12008

You are using the approach of talking directly into the camera... there is nothing wrong with this (I use a similar approach for presentation style videos). As a note be mindful that when you do this you are only talking to a single person. Cater your speech to the individual watching your video. There is no group of subscribers on the couch huddled around their phone. It's one person; treat the viewer as such.

Your style though is a little bland. Though minimal, can you see the difference in the lighting that the BBC is using in their shots? They are setting up lights specifically to shine a light of the bald parts of these guys heads (I am not even kidding). They are seating them in such a way so that the lighted parts of their faces are contrasting against the darker backgrounds. They seated these guys in a way that causes the lines of the windows and angles of the walls to draw the eye towards them as a focal point of the shot. They also Switch up the focus and zoom in on these guys as they are talking. I would highly encourage you to add this knowledge to your presentation.

Watch Nick Nimmin. He does this straight-to-the-camera style presentation. He is bouncing all over the place when he talks. It creates movement and action. You don't need your footage to look like a rave at Club 54... but a little activity in the shot to help keep interest will help video performance. I would suggest zooming in/out of some of your clips to help with this, and I would HIGHLY advise you go to Home Depot/WalMart/Sutherlands and get 2-3 super-cheap can construction lights and some super cheap, low-intensity light bulbs to 'paint your set.' Spend a little time creating a more complex, intriguing visual presentation to add to your solid script work, editing and story-telling. There are a ton of videos out there on beginner lighting tricks that when combined with some simple editing and movement will likely provide a significant upstroke in your overall video performance.

You are skilled and you are talented... might as well bring the set design up to your caliber of video!
Thanks so much for the time you put into this critique Stanley I really appreciate it! Lighting is something that has been a constant issue for me. Thankfully I have just about saved up enough to get a couple lights to add to my setup. I have been watching some of the biggest YouTubers in my niche and trying to take some of what they do like video organization, lighting etc. and put that into my own videos. Thanks again!
 

Stanley | Team TB

Amazingly Decent and Not-At-All Terrible Fishing
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Hey man, you are doing it right. I get excited reviewing your work; you know what you are doing and you are getting better with every video.
 

mediabanjar

New Member
TubeBuddy User
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mediabanjar

New Member
TubeBuddy User
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Also please consider asking the cameraman to move in and out or sideways while videotaping you. This would make it more interesting for the video viewer. But your sound and audio were good and the topic was interesting.
 

CheapDreams

New Member
7
4
ill be brutaly honnest. the video got more engaging as it went on but not because of the content. in the beginning, you seemed uncomfortable and robotic luckily as the video went on and as you you're talking about your passion you became more lively and engaging.
so my tips for you. lookup videos on conveying confidence and body language to improve your channel. intill all that kicks in ( faking it intill you naturally convey confidence) try filming more of your torso this will make hand jesters easier to see which does so much for engagement.
also, a small thing I noticed. this is so small it probably doesn't matter but I would not shoot in front of a clock because it highlights your edits.