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YouTube Tips How to Translate Your Videos Into Different Languages

Stanley | Team TB

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One of the more valuable aspects of YouTube and Google is the unabated ability to get in front of a global audience. Never before could some random user make a product and put it in front of eyes on the other end of the globe... and today it can be done in minutes, for multiple countries and cultures and you don't ever have to have spoken a word of the language you are getting front of.

YouTube offers you the ability to translate your videos into multiple languages so that you can provide value to those whom you normally would not reach and the process for doing so is actually very easy... but there are some tricks and things you need to know in order to do this successfully. I am not only going to show you how to translate your videos for an international audience, but I will also show you how to avoid some of the biggest mistakes that are made when doing so.

Translating your video begins after you have uploaded it. For a variety of reasons I would encourage you to upload your videos as Private or Unlisted (preferably Unlisted). One of the reasons is so that you can do your translations before the video goes public, but it also allows YouTube's Adsense partners to review your video and issue demonitization flags before it goes public. That way you can fix things before they are an issue.

For avid TubeBuddy users you first need to do your keyword research; you want to have your Title and Description totally planned out and packed with keywords before you translate. All of your metadata is going to get translated and you want to match your discovery in different countries as much as you do here. However, one thing to be mindful of is cultural and geographical differences that can render the value of your translation null. An example of this is when you target keyword phrases for locations. If you are targeting terms related to 'fishing on padre island texas' then people in South Korea are not likely to care. It is better in this sense to target something more general, like 'beach fishing on an island.' For the purposes of translations you can actually write two different sets of titles/descriptions. Write the title/description that matches what you want your international audience to see and make your translations, then go back afterwards and enter your original title/description.

Once your metadata is all ready to go you can begin translating. To do so first go to your Video Details page and select 'Subtitles' from the menu at the left or right side of the screen:

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The single most important step to translations is to first edit your captions. This can actually be a pretty important step in the video upload process regardless of translations. YouTube automatically captions your videos for you... and it is comical how bad these auto-captions can be. Often do they not only get it wrong but they seem to recognize and change the most mundane statements into curse words... which can directly affect your discovery and monetization. To edit these captions select 'DUPLICATE AND EDIT' in the first set of captions.

On this screen you can either go through the mass amount of text that has been auto-captioned and simply re-write anything that is incorrect. Personally I select 'EDIT TIMINGS' so that I can not only edit the text itself but when it appears on screen. I go through each and every statement making sure that words are spelled correctly. If something appears confusing I will even cut down and simplify the caption. The key here is so that someone watching who can not hear can still get the gist of what is happening. The captions need to be clear and concise and it is important to recognize that any metadata for your video that is mentioned is done so well. YouTube is listening and it is very likely they are looking at keywords in the captions of your videos. I can't confirm this... but I can confirm that YouTube is listening and that we know they are at least listening for curse words and advertiser flags.

1640615051368.png

Once your captions have been edited hit 'PUBLISH' and the hard part is over. It's time to start adding languages... so go ahead and hit that 'ADD LANGAUGE' button and let's roll!

When you hit add language you are given an option of what language to add. Once you have selected a language it will be added to the list of languages your video is available in. Hit 'ADD' under the Subtitles option for this language and it will open a menu for various translation options. Hit 'Auto-Translate' and YouTube will automatically translate your captions in this language for you.

Note: If you have not edited your captions and published them then the auto-translate feature here will be greyed out. You can not auto-translate generic auto-captions.
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Next hit 'ADD' under this languages Title and Description. This opens a screen with your title and description in it's original language on the left and allows you to enter your translated titles/description in the right. You need to have your title and description copied onto a word doc or sticky note. At this stage I open two browser windows to Google Translate and put them side by side. One contains my title and the other contains my description. That way you can go and simply change the language for each translation, copy and paste into the translated section.
Note: TubeBuddy Legend users will have the option to auto-translate here... making this portion of the process far less painstaking. Just hit that TB TRANSLATE button and the title/description get automatically filled out for you.
1640615902758.png

And that is it, the video has now been translated. After the captions are done it is really an easy process and something that takes about 30 minutes to complete once you get the hang of it. What's fun about this is that you stand a chance for ranking for these translated terms just like anything else. Not only does this put you in front of foreign eyes but you can also hold foreign search ranks. You can't really check that and they are not as important as your regular ranks, but keep an eye on the YouTube Search Traffic Reach under the Reach tab of your video's analytics to see what keywords you are gaining the most traffic from. As you begin to translate videos they will begin to trend in various other languages as well:
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Some final notes for translations:
No, they are not perfect. It is important to try and keep those captions simple because YouTube gets translations wrong. But it is a free ay to get in front of a lot more eyes. Having done translations for about four years now I personally see about 17% of my traffic from foreign sources, which is worth it to me. I've had a couple videos pop in different countries for weird reasons I can not describe, but it worked. Be advised that CPM's globally fluctuate and can be vastly different than what you typically see.
 

MattCommand1

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Wow, just wow! I bookmarked this post also for my reference.

I stumbled my way into some of this because I saw that YT transcribes text which I assumed YT would analyze the spoken word content. So, I use the Subtitle function for every video I post. I do correct spelling and other major errors but I don't go through the hassle of capitalization or punctuation.

I have thought about translating additional languages but wasn't sure if it was "worth it". Certainly, Spanish is "worthwhile" but I had not looked into the Top 5 or Top 10 languages I would want to be translated.

I can see that this is definitely something I will want to do, to make my videos more SEO friendly in other languages. Even outside of SEO, there is value in creating a fanbase that is beyond English-speaking countries.
 

Colachelnoor

New Member
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Excellent article with lot of information. This will be useful for me.

I have a question.
My youtube channel language is Tamil.
Should I type my Subtitles in Tamil first and then move to English or
I can straight away type English captions.
What I do is typing English Subtitles directly.
 

sjs94704

Familiar Member
63
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So far I have done this on a few of my videos and YES!, I have invested the time to be sure that the proper punctuation and capitalizations are correct.
It was so well worth it to do that! I have also taken the time to be absolutely sure that my timings are right! Sometimes, YT puts the captions out of
sync with what is being said at a few given moments and it makes my videos look really bad if I don't fix those! That means I gotta go through the
'hassle' of watching the entire movie anyway to get those right so it is a perfect time to fix the punctuation and capitalizations, getting them all done
at the same time! Makes my videos look so much more professional looking and as you say, when YT goes to translate, it will be able to do that so
much easier! I will continue to do that every time I post a new video! What do they say, "The devil is in the details!". When I ignore those details in my
videos now, when I want to take advantage of a feature like this in the future and by then I have hundreds of videos on my channel it becomes a
monumental task and one which I might pass up and then end up missing out on the opportunities it might bring me if I had been able to translate my
videos properly!

Anyway, good to know that, that is what it takes and that it what I have been doing all along! Chalk one up for the guy with a small channel!
 
OP
OP
Stanley | Team TB

Stanley | Team TB

Amazingly Decent and Not-At-All Terrible Fishing
Administrator
TubeBuddy Staff
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Excellent article with lot of information. This will be useful for me.

I have a question.
My youtube channel language is Tamil.
Should I type my Subtitles in Tamil first and then move to English or
I can straight away type English captions.
What I do is typing English Subtitles directly.
Start with the native language of your channel
 

pyar ali

New Member
1
1
It's a great free way, but it's not perfect in terms of translation, because for native speakers it sometimes looks like pffftschsch, to be honest. Therefore, after a year of independent attempts, I began to look for options for a more professional translation. From what is suitable for the price/quality, for now, stop at the air media-tech and their translation. Now I am trying to translate not just subtitles, but also voice videos because the metric from other languages is really good
 

Alex001

New Member
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1
Hello,

While machine translation may have some limitations in terms of accuracy and linguistic nuances, offering translated videos in different languages is still a solid strategy to attract a wider audience and increase views. Be sure to monitor viewer comments and feedback to continually adjust and improve your translations.

I use the online video translation platform Video Translator to translate and upload my videos on Youtube in several languages, I find this method is much better than the translation of subs title of youtube, having a translated video for each language brings more visitors and more views.

Using an external translation platform to translate and upload your videos to YouTube in multiple languages offers many benefits in terms of accessibility, viewer engagement, SEO, and professional image. It is an effective method to increase your visibility and your audience on an international scale.
 

Xavier De Buck

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It's a great free way, but it's not perfect in terms of translation, because for native speakers it sometimes looks like pffftschsch, to be honest. Therefore, after a year of independent attempts, I began to look for options for a more professional translation. From what is suitable for the price/quality, for now, stop at the air media-tech and their translation. Now I am trying to translate not just subtitles, but also voice videos because the metric from other languages is really good
Noticed this post earlier just now - I'm curious to hear what you do with the audio translated video now. It's all dubbed, I assume? Do you upload the video with new language as a new video then?
 

videodub

New Member
I totally agree with you on how much it matters to think about different language audiences.

I wanted to share that at VideoDub.io, we're trying to make things easier. We've made a tool that uses AI to do all the translating stuff. You upload a video, it figures out what's being said, translates it, and adds a voice-over in another language.

The big idea is to help creators reach people all over the world without the hassle of language barriers. We're really excited about making it simple and quick for everyone.
 

Xavier De Buck

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I totally agree with you on how much it matters to think about different language audiences.

I wanted to share that at VideoDub.io, we're trying to make things easier. We've made a tool that uses AI to do all the translating stuff. You upload a video, it figures out what's being said, translates it, and adds a voice-over in another language.

The big idea is to help creators reach people all over the world without the hassle of language barriers. We're really excited about making it simple and quick for everyone.
Sounds amazing indeed - my question as a creator is what to do once it's dubbed with the voice-over. Do I now upload the same video in English, another video in Spanish, etc?

Curious to hear your thoughts on this.
 

videodub

New Member
Sounds amazing indeed - my question as a creator is what to do once it's dubbed with the voice-over. Do I now upload the same video in English, another video in Spanish, etc?

Curious to hear your thoughts on this.

Great question! At the moment, once the voice-over is added to your video, you would need to upload it as a separate video in the translated language. So if you have an English video and you used our tool to add a Spanish voice-over, you'd end up with two videos: one in English and one in Spanish.

This allows you to tailor the content for different language audiences and may even help with discoverability since you could use language-specific keywords in the video's metadata.

I understand this might be a bit more work at the moment, but we're always thinking about ways to improve and make things even more user-friendly. Integration with video hosting services is something that might come in the future.

And who knows, maybe one day platforms like YouTube might even have their own built-in translation and voice-over services. Until then, we're trying to help bridge that gap.

I hope that helps!
 

Xavier De Buck

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Great question! At the moment, once the voice-over is added to your video, you would need to upload it as a separate video in the translated language. So if you have an English video and you used our tool to add a Spanish voice-over, you'd end up with two videos: one in English and one in Spanish.

This allows you to tailor the content for different language audiences and may even help with discoverability since you could use language-specific keywords in the video's metadata.

I understand this might be a bit more work at the moment, but we're always thinking about ways to improve and make things even more user-friendly. Integration with video hosting services is something that might come in the future.

And who knows, maybe one day platforms like YouTube might even have their own built-in translation and voice-over services. Until then, we're trying to help bridge that gap.

I hope that helps!
Very nice indeed - or, one can do like Mr Beast and start a new channel in that particular language