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YouTube Question No views on your first videos - what did you do to fix it?

Dr Pixel Plays

Recognized Member
TubeBuddy Pro
88
9
Well, I've started a month ago, and now I have 700 views in total.

The first views and subs you get are usually from friends. I wouldn't urge them to subscribe, though. If they just sub because you are friends and don't watch any videos, they are an inactive subscriber. But however, they can help you out with feedback and such.

I didn't have that much success with let's play content, but I saw you are not doing that. You cut quite a lot and put some entertaining music under it, so I would not necessarily market it as a let's play series. I don't know how many videos you want to make of the same game(you put numbers in the title), so maybe go with lets plays. It's up to you what you want to do. With your titles and thumbnails, I could see that working. Your videos have quality, that's a great start!

First of all, it takes some time for YouTube to understand what your channel is all about.

One good source for traffic is of course SEO. Ranking for games isn't easy, except they are really niche, so you probably want to find something inside that game niche.

For example, one of my videos is called " When Dual-Wielding Melts Bosses in Gunfire Reborn, Ao Bai(Second Hero)".
That video got 60% of its traffic from the YouTube search. I targeted tags like "gunfire reborn dual wield" or "gunfire reborn dog build".
It's not easy to find the balance between too niche and too competitive at the beginning. A new channel simply gets not enough views on their videos to compete a lot.
Your first video seems to not rank at all, so I would redo the SEO for less competitive keywords. Try the keyword explorer and YouTube search auto-suggest to find new keywords.

When I started my SEO wasn't great and basically all views were from friends.

Once I started posting my videos elsewhere, I saw view counts in the few dozens. So what I would recommend is posting your videos on steam or discord or other sites. This helps a lot in the beginning. For example, I've posted my last video under the game page on Itch.io and so far the video got a third of its traffic just from the one post that took me 5 minutes to make. So if you find a way to promote your content on places where it's appropriate go for it.

That's how I've been slowly growing my channel.

My next plan is to focus on one game and make half of my videos about that game, so I get a lot of people interested in my channel who also play that game. If they find one video of mine, they can watch a lot of my other videos, thus increasing watch time on older videos. It also helps you with ranking, since YouTube learns that your channel makes a lot of content about that game.

But keep in mind that, even if you are doing everything right, it's all about exponential growth. So you might only get 100 views in the first month, but then 200, and 400, and one day you get more views than you could have ever imagined. So the most important thing, in the beginning, is to just produce awesome content, and slowly you'll get somewhere. It takes time.
 
OP
OP
Xarty

Xarty

New Member
5
3
www.youtube.com
Subscriber Goal
100
Well, I've started a month ago, and now I have 700 views in total.

The first views and subs you get are usually from friends. I wouldn't urge them to subscribe, though. If they just sub because you are friends and don't watch any videos, they are an inactive subscriber. But however, they can help you out with feedback and such.

I didn't have that much success with let's play content, but I saw you are not doing that. You cut quite a lot and put some entertaining music under it, so I would not necessarily market it as a let's play series. I don't know how many videos you want to make of the same game(you put numbers in the title), so maybe go with lets plays. It's up to you what you want to do. With your titles and thumbnails, I could see that working. Your videos have quality, that's a great start!

First of all, it takes some time for YouTube to understand what your channel is all about.

One good source for traffic is of course SEO. Ranking for games isn't easy, except they are really niche, so you probably want to find something inside that game niche.

For example, one of my videos is called " When Dual-Wielding Melts Bosses in Gunfire Reborn, Ao Bai(Second Hero)".
That video got 60% of its traffic from the YouTube search. I targeted tags like "gunfire reborn dual wield" or "gunfire reborn dog build".
It's not easy to find the balance between too niche and too competitive at the beginning. A new channel simply gets not enough views on their videos to compete a lot.
Your first video seems to not rank at all, so I would redo the SEO for less competitive keywords. Try the keyword explorer and YouTube search auto-suggest to find new keywords.

When I started my SEO wasn't great and basically all views were from friends.

Once I started posting my videos elsewhere, I saw view counts in the few dozens. So what I would recommend is posting your videos on steam or discord or other sites. This helps a lot in the beginning. For example, I've posted my last video under the game page on Itch.io and so far the video got a third of its traffic just from the one post that took me 5 minutes to make. So if you find a way to promote your content on places where it's appropriate go for it.

That's how I've been slowly growing my channel.

My next plan is to focus on one game and make half of my videos about that game, so I get a lot of people interested in my channel who also play that game. If they find one video of mine, they can watch a lot of my other videos, thus increasing watch time on older videos. It also helps you with ranking, since YouTube learns that your channel makes a lot of content about that game.

But keep in mind that, even if you are doing everything right, it's all about exponential growth. So you might only get 100 views in the first month, but then 200, and 400, and one day you get more views than you could have ever imagined. So the most important thing, in the beginning, is to just produce awesome content, and slowly you'll get somewhere. It takes time.
Thanks for the reply!
For now I basically only post the videos on FB groups and sometimes my friends. When I start a series from a game that actually can be finished, then I'll probably make as many episodes as it requires for me to finish the game within them, aiming for the length between 8-20 minutes, never longer.
For SEO I just help myself with a browser plugin similar to TubeBuddy (I won't provide a name so I won't advertise something else, I might later change the plugin to TubeBuddy though).
 

Ater

Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
129
13
In the beginning I just made gaming videos for a group of friends, videos of our gaming sessions, with no intent of anyone outside our group to watch them. So my first few hundreds of views came from that group of gaming friends.

When I started making videos with the intent of actually getting views and having new people find my videos I quickly learned that I had to change to a smaller niche for my videos to be able to be found. First I went from making videos for a huge very popular game to a smaller but still popular game with a much smaller YouTube presence. But that wasn't enough even with the smaller niche I couldn't compete with the larger more established channels. So I had to find a even smaller niche, after som research I found out that all the channels creating content for the smaller game was doing game play videos, very few where doing guides and tutorials. This is where my channel started finding some succes and getting larger amounts of views. I had very little competition so my guides usually ended up in the top 3 spots compared to my gameplay videos that very few found.

Another mistake I did in the beginning where making videos for different games early on, so if one person found my channel because of my video for game X and then checked out my channel for more game X content and instead he found game Y and Z content he left. Or if someone really liked my video and subscribed but then my next few videos where for other games that he had no interest in he unsubscribed. I found my self doing a bunch of videos for one game and they started to do decently getting a fair bit of views, then I jumped to another game getting 0-5 views since non of my subscribers had subscribed for that game. It wasn't until more recently, during the last maybe 1.5 year as my channel have grown a bit, I started to feel that branching out to other games worked a bit better but still I need to do it really slow adding just one game at the time to the games my channel create videos for and I still need to make sure to create videos for the core game every now and then.
 

Beanie Draws

Moderator
Moderator
1,597
25
www.youtube.com
Subscriber Goal
30000
I still remember my first videos :)
They got maybe one view, maybe they got no views, because realistically I only wanted more content on my channel. I didn't expect anyone to care about a channel that only had 2 or 3 videos, so I didn't start seriously caring about views until I had 10 videos under my belt.

Because I'm an artist, I've grown up with the mindset of gallery exhibitions. You can exhibit one artwork without anyone knowing who you are, but few will care. But have an exhibition of 10-30 great artworks and people will take a look at a few of them.

I didn't start getting views until my 30th video I think, and I was focusing on a niche I was passionate about, Jurassic Park. And other people seemed to care about it too, and they were interested in what I had to share and it went from there :)