• Guest - Earn a FREE TubeBuddy Upgrade for being active on the forums! Click Here to learn how you earn free upgrades for TubeBuddy!
  • Guest - TubeBuddy has a discord! Click Here to join in the conversation!

YouTube Tips Case Study | How to Get 100k Subscribers | Thundermist Lures Company

Damon

Trusted User
Trusted User
1,831
24
www.blackwarriorlures.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
I use this as an example: Thundermist Lures has been making weekly fishing videos since 2007. They just hit 100,000 subscribers.

The Numbers
Do the math: 13 years. It took 13 years of producing one awesome fishing video per week. (fewer than that, but more on that later)
  • 1 video per week * 52 weeks per year = 52 videos per year.
  • 52 videos per year * 13 years = 676 videos.
If you click on the play all videos tab, you'll see 517 total videos. Get this: That's less than one video per week. Less than one video per week!

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6mb6SjZ7no&feature=youtu.be


The Video Quality
The format is very much like most Saturday morning fishing T. V. shows. In fact his format has become simpler over time because he used to have segments and such. The video quality is "near" T. V. standard. It's clear that he has spent time understanding how motion picture works. If you watch your favorite shows and copy what you see them doing, you'll learn all you need.

The Thumbnails
Looks at them, they aren't that great. However they do one thing well, they show exactly what the video is about. The very fish he is targeting in the title is the very fish you see in the thumbnail. This way people know that he is on the water, as opposed to being in the shop. Thumbnails don't have to be glitzy, they have to communicate what the video is about.

The Keywords, Tags, Titles
From the looks of it he isn't doing keywords like you and me here on TubeBuddy, but he is ranking. Even though he isn't doing best practice, he still managed to get 100k subs!

The Business Model
It's impossible to know exactly the business model looking from the outside in, but as a fellow fishing tackle shop owner, his primary revenue is not the stupid ads. He has a real business that has made him revenue all these years. People get hung up on ads, and that's just extra money to buy ice cream. You have to build a real business in order to be successful on YouTube, imo. Very few of us will be able to make it on ad revenue alone. It takes a long time to makes significant ad revenue.

Use the ad revenue to plow back into business to make more business. Buy camera upgrades, maybe take a business class or buy some books on sales and marketing.

Take Away
  1. How long are you willing to stick with it?
  2. What is your business model?
(NOTE: The original post had errors in the math, but I corrected them. The numbers still come out the same, less than one video per week.)
 
Last edited:

Stanley Orchard

Moderator
Moderator
551
17
Subscriber Goal
250000
Well said sir... this was an excellent read and a perfect breakdown of what to expect on the YT journey. This covers two topics that seem to go highly unrecognized by beginners: the shear quantity of content you should be expecting to make and the value of having a business that your channel supports (as opposed to your channel and adsense revenue being the business).
 

Andrew

Superman
Administrator
8,019
33
youtube.com
Subscriber Goal
5000
I use this as an example: Thunder Mist Lures has been making weekly fishing videos since 2007. They just hit 100,000 subscribers.

The Numbers
Do the math: 17 years. It took 17 years of producing one awesome fishing video per week. (fewer than that, but more on that later)
  • 1 video per week * 52 weeks per year = 52 videos per year.
  • 52 videos per year * 17 years = 884 videos.
If you click on the play all videos tab, you'll see 517 total videos. Get this: That's less than one video per week. Less than one video per week!

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6mb6SjZ7no&feature=youtu.be


The Video Quality
The format is very much like most Saturday morning fishing T. V. shows. In fact his format has become simpler over time because he used to have segments and such. The video quality is "near" T. V. standard. It's clear that he has spent time understanding how motion picture works. If you watch your favorite shows and copy what you see them doing, you'll learn all you need.

The Thumbnails
Looks at them, they aren't that great. However they do one thing well, they show exactly what the video is about. The very fish he is targeting in the title is the very fish you see in the thumbnail. This way people know that he is on the water, as opposed to being in the shop. Thumbnails don't have to be glitzy, they have to communicate what the video is about.

The Keywords, Tags, Titles
From the looks of it he isn't doing keywords like you and me here on TubeBuddy, but he is ranking. Even though he isn't doing best practice, he still managed to get 100k subs!

The Business Model
It's impossible to know exactly the business model looking from the outside in, but as a fellow fishing tackle shop owner, his primary revenue is not the stupid ads. He has a real business that has made him revenue all these years. People get hung up on ads, and that's just extra money to buy ice cream. You have to build a real business in order to be successful on YouTube, imo. Very few of us will be able to make it on ad revenue alone. It takes a long time to makes significant ad revenue.

Use the ad revenue to plow back into business to make more business. Buy camera upgrades, maybe take a business class or buy some books on sales and marketing.

Take Away
  1. How long are you willing to stick with it?
  2. What is your business model?
I'd add to this they knew their target audience, and channels value. That can't be overlooked here they knew who they wanted to help. GREAT breakdown damon :D
 

Ater

Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
131
13
13 years, not 17, but still a wonderful post. A lot of good insites, especially for new YouTubers that expect everything to happen over night. I watched the 100 000 subscribers video and then I went to the channel and used sort by oldest and quickly skimmed through a few of them. It was like another world comparing the first videos to his newest talk about evolving and steady improving through the years, a true YouTube inspiration.
 

ChaseEverett

New Member
8
4
Take Away
  1. How long are you willing to stick with it?
  2. What is your business model?
(NOTE: The original post had errors in the math, but I corrected them. The numbers still come out the same, less than one video per week.)
I'm 16, had my channel for about 4 years, even though I just started using it. I have nothing but time.
 

originalraith

Active Member
TubeBuddy Pro
42
8
I use this as an example: Thundermist Lures has been making weekly fishing videos since 2007. They just hit 100,000 subscribers.

The Numbers
Do the math: 13 years. It took 13 years of producing one awesome fishing video per week. (fewer than that, but more on that later)
  • 1 video per week * 52 weeks per year = 52 videos per year.
  • 52 videos per year * 13 years = 676 videos.
If you click on the play all videos tab, you'll see 517 total videos. Get this: That's less than one video per week. Less than one video per week!

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6mb6SjZ7no&feature=youtu.be


The Video Quality
The format is very much like most Saturday morning fishing T. V. shows. In fact his format has become simpler over time because he used to have segments and such. The video quality is "near" T. V. standard. It's clear that he has spent time understanding how motion picture works. If you watch your favorite shows and copy what you see them doing, you'll learn all you need.

The Thumbnails
Looks at them, they aren't that great. However they do one thing well, they show exactly what the video is about. The very fish he is targeting in the title is the very fish you see in the thumbnail. This way people know that he is on the water, as opposed to being in the shop. Thumbnails don't have to be glitzy, they have to communicate what the video is about.

The Keywords, Tags, Titles
From the looks of it he isn't doing keywords like you and me here on TubeBuddy, but he is ranking. Even though he isn't doing best practice, he still managed to get 100k subs!

The Business Model
It's impossible to know exactly the business model looking from the outside in, but as a fellow fishing tackle shop owner, his primary revenue is not the stupid ads. He has a real business that has made him revenue all these years. People get hung up on ads, and that's just extra money to buy ice cream. You have to build a real business in order to be successful on YouTube, imo. Very few of us will be able to make it on ad revenue alone. It takes a long time to makes significant ad revenue.

Use the ad revenue to plow back into business to make more business. Buy camera upgrades, maybe take a business class or buy some books on sales and marketing.

Take Away
  1. How long are you willing to stick with it?
  2. What is your business model?
(NOTE: The original post had errors in the math, but I corrected them. The numbers still come out the same, less than one video per week.)
very accurate :) he has money and.... and... and... HE INVESTS IT BACK INTO HIS YT CHANNEL!!!!
 

Kari B

Known Member
105
8
Subscriber Goal
100000
13 years, not 17, but still a wonderful post. A lot of good insites, especially for new YouTubers that expect everything to happen over night. I watched the 100 000 subscribers video and then I went to the channel and used sort by oldest and quickly skimmed through a few of them. It was like another world comparing the first videos to his newest talk about evolving and steady improving through the years, a true YouTube inspiration.
I look back now at my videos from 2 years ago and I can see the development. This is another reason I'm sometimes glad I didn't grow quickly, it's given me a chance to learn and improve.
I think there is a lot more help and guidance now than there was 13 years ago, but also a lot more competition. Would I wait 13 years for 100,000 subs - yes if I was enjoying it.
 

Micheal11

New Member
1
2
I use this as an example: Thundermist Lures has been making weekly fishing videos since 2007. They just hit 100,000 subscribers.

The Numbers
Do the math: 13 years. It took 13 years of producing one awesome fishing video per week. (fewer than that, but more on that later)
  • 1 video per week * 52 weeks per year = 52 videos per year.
  • 52 videos per year * 13 years = 676 videos.
If you click on the play all videos tab, you'll see 517 total videos. Get this: That's less than one video per week. Less than one video per week!

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6mb6SjZ7no&feature=youtu.be


The Video Quality
The format is very much like most Saturday morning fishing T. V. shows. In fact his format has become simpler over time because he used to have segments and such. The video quality is "near" T. V. standard. It's clear that he has spent time understanding how motion picture works. If you watch your favorite shows and copy what you see them doing, you'll learn all you need.

The Thumbnails
Looks at them, they aren't that great. However they do one thing well, they show exactly what the video is about. The very fish he is targeting in the title is the very fish you see in the thumbnail. This way people know that he is on the water, as opposed to being in the shop. Thumbnails don't have to be glitzy, they have to communicate what the video is about.

The Keywords, Tags, Titles
From the looks of it he isn't doing keywords like you and me here on TubeBuddy, but he is ranking. Even though he isn't doing best practice, he still managed to get 100k subs!

The Business Model
It's impossible to know exactly the business model looking from the outside in, but as a fellow fishing tackle shop owner, his primary revenue is not the stupid ads. He has a real business that has made him revenue all these years. People get hung up on ads, and that's just extra money to buy ice cream. You have to build a real business in order to be successful on YouTube, imo. Very few of us will be able to make it on ad revenue alone. It takes a long time to makes significant ad revenue.

Use the ad revenue to plow back into business to make more business. Buy camera upgrades, maybe take a business class or buy some books on sales and marketing.

Take Away
  1. How long are you willing to stick with it?
  2. What is your business model?
(NOTE: The original post had errors in the math, but I corrected them. The numbers still come out the same, less than one video per week.)
How do I tag?
 

Jarvis Phan

Active Member
TubeBuddy User
34
6
Thanks for the insight! Now I know I have to endure 13 years and create a piano cover every week which equals to 676 videos to have a chance at 100,000 subs! There is still hope to getting the Silver Creator Award from YouTube.