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YouTube Tips 3 Things To Understand Before Starting A YouTube Channel

Bravestarr | Team TB

Life ain't no Nintendo Game
Moderator
2,113
24
Subscriber Goal
1000
When I tried starting a channel for the first time, like many, I had this fantasy of becoming a success, a hit overnight. I had no idea how YouTube worked back then, and even worse I had no idea how much YouTube had changed. What were popular channels at the time were the pioneers of YouTube but the hard work and strategies they used to get to their status on YouTube did not work on the YouTube of my time. Thus I went on to seek new strategies to start a new channel and here are a few things I learned.

1) YouTube is about the viewers, not the creators - At one time YouTube was all about the creators. Their popularity was the key to YouTube's strategy to grow and become the go-to website for online entertainment, education and news. But these days it's all about the viewers. The more people come to YouTube to watch videos and the more time they spend watching videos the more YouTube promotes the creators who succeed at keeping viewers on the platform for longer periods of time. So remember, when creating content, think of the audience you're trying to reach. Think of what content they want to see. Try to understand how to make your content worth watching and worth watching so much that they will watch another of your videos. The longer you keep viewers on your videos, the better your analytics and the better the chances of YouTube promoting your videos.

2) Audio is more important than you think - This is not to say you need a $200 mic when making your videos but if you take yourself as an example of a viewer, ask yourself how often have you skipped over a video because their audio just wasn't worth watching the video? A mic that makes the audio sound like headphones from the 80s or the sounds of the city around you becoming part of your content or even some terrible hissing or high bass audio that distracts from the commenting can make any video cringy enough to be ignored by most. A decent mic, noise-blocking solutions like moving blankets and even some audio editing software like Audacity can make wonders for your audio.

3) Content before subs and views - While I understand that the average YouTuber longs for lots of subscribers and lots of views in order to reach the requirements to be a YouTube partner, you have to understand that growing a channel for most YouTubers is hard work. It takes time and patience to grow a channel. That's why it is essential that as a creator you focus on creating content first, lots of it. If you are to set goals for your channel set a goal for how many videos to create. At a minimum, you should strive to create at least 100 videos in your first year before you should start worrying about subs and views. Think of it as experience. You can't expect a company to consider hiring you if you have little or no experience, by the same token you can't expect YouTube's algorithm to share your content to potential new viewers if you don't have enough content to make it worth YouTube's while to promote you. granted, there are those who defy the inner workings of YouTube's algorithm and become overnight sensations, but bare in mind that every new YouTuber is competing against not only thousands of new YouTubers but also against more mature channels as well. Sometimes you get lucky and you manage to find that perfect recipe to become an overnight sensation, but it can often be a short-lived success if you don't have the experience and the knowledge to repeat that success. So even though you may not be getting views, even though your subscriber base is not growing as fast as you'd like, keep going, keep creating, keep uploading. Learn as you go, improve and don't give up. YouTube may not be for everyone but that doesn't mean you give up so quickly.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Bravestarr | Team TB

Bravestarr | Team TB

Life ain't no Nintendo Game
Moderator
2,113
24
Subscriber Goal
1000
Very refreshing. Sadly the very next post in this forum will probably be some one asking how to get more subs and views. Most simply don't want to believe this is hard work.
It's a sad truth. I started my first channel with the notion of becoming a sensation overnight and making money just like everyone else. But as I worked on my content I realized I had a knack for video and photo editing and even though my channel was not growing I was enjoying making content. Now I know better and my next channel will be based on a mentality of quality content built on hard work and patience. I may not be able to convince a lot of people, but if I can get at least one or two to understand then mission accomplished.
 

nomarics

New Member
7
4
Subscriber Goal
100
When I tried starting a channel for the first time, like many, I had this fantasy of becoming a success, a hit overnight. I had no idea how YouTube worked back then, and even worse I had no idea how much YouTube had changed. What were popular channels at the time were the pioneers of YouTube but the hard work and strategies they used to get to their status on YouTube did not work on the YouTube of my time. Thus I went on to seek new strategies to start a new channel and here are a few things I learned.

1) YouTube is about the viewers, not the creators - At one time YouTube was all about the creators. Their popularity was the key to YouTube's strategy to grow and become the go-to website for online entertainment, education and news. But these days it's all about the viewers. The more people come to YouTube to watch videos and the more time they spend watching videos the more YouTube promotes the creators who succeed at keeping viewers on the platform for longer periods of time. So remember, when creating content, think of the audience you're trying to reach. Think of what content they want to see. Try to understand how to make your content worth watching and worth watching so much that they will watch another of your videos. The longer you keep viewers on your videos, the better your analytics and the better the chances of YouTube promoting your videos.

2) Audio is more important than you think - This is not to say you need a $200 mic when making your videos but if you take yourself as an example of a viewer, ask yourself how often have you skipped over a video because their audio just wasn't worth watching the video? A mic that makes the audio sound like headphones from the 80s or the sounds of the city around you becoming part of your content or even some terrible hissing or high bass audio that distracts from the commenting can make any video cringy enough to be ignored by most. A decent mic, noise-blocking solutions like moving blankets and even some audio editing software like Audacity can make wonders for your audio.

3) Content before subs and views - While I understand that the average YouTuber longs for lots of subscribers and lots of views in order to reach the requirements to be a YouTube partner, you have to understand that growing a channel for most YouTubers is hard work. It takes time and patience to grow a channel. That's why it is essential that as a creator you focus on creating content first, lots of it. If you are to set goals for your channel set a goal for how many videos to create. At a minimum, you should strive to create at least 100 videos in your first year before you should start worrying about subs and views. Think of it as experience. You can't expect a company to consider hiring you if you have little or no experience, by the same token you can't expect YouTube's algorithm to share your content to potential new viewers if you don't have enough content to make it worth YouTube's while to promote you. granted, there are those who defy the inner workings of YouTube's algorithm and become overnight sensations, but bare in mind that every new YouTuber is competing against not only thousands of new YouTubers but also against more mature channels as well. Sometimes you get lucky and you manage to find that perfect recipe to become an overnight sensation, but it can often be a short-lived success if you don't have the experience and the knowledge to repeat that success. So even though you may not be getting views, even though your subscriber base is not growing as fast as you'd like, keep going, keep creating, keep uploading. Learn as you go, improve and don't give up. YouTube may not be for everyone but that doesn't mean you give up so quickly.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
correct and thank you, evey time I get upset because of subs and views I always remember that it is the content that matters and the best thing is that other people who watched your videos can learn and draw some inspirations from you
 
OP
OP
Bravestarr | Team TB

Bravestarr | Team TB

Life ain't no Nintendo Game
Moderator
2,113
24
Subscriber Goal
1000
correct and thank you, evey time I get upset because of subs and views I always remember that it is the content that matters and the best thing is that other people who watched your videos can learn and draw some inspirations from you
Exactly, just remember to enjoy the process of creating content and entertaining/educating viewers that you get. The word spreads and before you know it you get more and more viewers. Learn as you go, improve your videos and you'll see your channel grow in time.
 

dennynj122002

New Member
20
5
Subscriber Goal
1000
When I tried starting a channel for the first time, like many, I had this fantasy of becoming a success, a hit overnight. I had no idea how YouTube worked back then, and even worse I had no idea how much YouTube had changed. What were popular channels at the time were the pioneers of YouTube but the hard work and strategies they used to get to their status on YouTube did not work on the YouTube of my time. Thus I went on to seek new strategies to start a new channel and here are a few things I learned.

1) YouTube is about the viewers, not the creators - At one time YouTube was all about the creators. Their popularity was the key to YouTube's strategy to grow and become the go-to website for online entertainment, education and news. But these days it's all about the viewers. The more people come to YouTube to watch videos and the more time they spend watching videos the more YouTube promotes the creators who succeed at keeping viewers on the platform for longer periods of time. So remember, when creating content, think of the audience you're trying to reach. Think of what content they want to see. Try to understand how to make your content worth watching and worth watching so much that they will watch another of your videos. The longer you keep viewers on your videos, the better your analytics and the better the chances of YouTube promoting your videos.

2) Audio is more important than you think - This is not to say you need a $200 mic when making your videos but if you take yourself as an example of a viewer, ask yourself how often have you skipped over a video because their audio just wasn't worth watching the video? A mic that makes the audio sound like headphones from the 80s or the sounds of the city around you becoming part of your content or even some terrible hissing or high bass audio that distracts from the commenting can make any video cringy enough to be ignored by most. A decent mic, noise-blocking solutions like moving blankets and even some audio editing software like Audacity can make wonders for your audio.

3) Content before subs and views - While I understand that the average YouTuber longs for lots of subscribers and lots of views in order to reach the requirements to be a YouTube partner, you have to understand that growing a channel for most YouTubers is hard work. It takes time and patience to grow a channel. That's why it is essential that as a creator you focus on creating content first, lots of it. If you are to set goals for your channel set a goal for how many videos to create. At a minimum, you should strive to create at least 100 videos in your first year before you should start worrying about subs and views. Think of it as experience. You can't expect a company to consider hiring you if you have little or no experience, by the same token you can't expect YouTube's algorithm to share your content to potential new viewers if you don't have enough content to make it worth YouTube's while to promote you. granted, there are those who defy the inner workings of YouTube's algorithm and become overnight sensations, but bare in mind that every new YouTuber is competing against not only thousands of new YouTubers but also against more mature channels as well. Sometimes you get lucky and you manage to find that perfect recipe to become an overnight sensation, but it can often be a short-lived success if you don't have the experience and the knowledge to repeat that success. So even though you may not be getting views, even though your subscriber base is not growing as fast as you'd like, keep going, keep creating, keep uploading. Learn as you go, improve and don't give up. YouTube may not be for everyone but that doesn't mean you give up so quickly.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
Thank you For Shading EVery Important Information I Need To Learn More And Thank You For Your Hardwork too

Very refreshing. Sadly the very next post in this forum will probably be some one asking how to get more subs and views. Most simply don't want to believe this is hard work.
Im Agrees With You Not Easy To Get Subs And Views.New Guys Like Me Get Less 11.000 View and About 21 Subs. I Need Focus What Next?How is Work ?,And To Many Question In Me Mind.That Just Small Channel Like Me..Not Like Big Channel how Hardwork to get there ,I speak out what I did been though couple till now :)
 

Damo’s Paintings

Extremely Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy User
425
16
Subscriber Goal
500000
This is great advice, my biggest drawbacks are my audio, ordered a wireless mic but not sure where it’s at for now, but the biggest problem for me is finding the time to even create my content, not just that, but with a baby in the house, and the fact that I’m producing oil painting videos, yeah babies and oil paintings aren’t exactly a good combination, couple that to the fact that she demands more and more of my attention, my only chance to get something created is when she is napping, which is a very unpredictable window of opportunity to get something done, and on top of that the blistering heat of summer isn’t helpful either especially when I’ve gotta open everything to let the smell of oil paint out, and all out before my girl wakes up, so with every odd against me boy have I got my work cut out for me, but me being me I wanna get creating so I can too become a good influence in the YouTube world. Wish me luck!
 

Beanie Draws

Mythical Poster
2,881
27
www.youtube.com
Subscriber Goal
30000
When I tried starting a channel for the first time, like many, I had this fantasy of becoming a success, a hit overnight. I had no idea how YouTube worked back then, and even worse I had no idea how much YouTube had changed. What were popular channels at the time were the pioneers of YouTube but the hard work and strategies they used to get to their status on YouTube did not work on the YouTube of my time. Thus I went on to seek new strategies to start a new channel and here are a few things I learned.

1) YouTube is about the viewers, not the creators - At one time YouTube was all about the creators. Their popularity was the key to YouTube's strategy to grow and become the go-to website for online entertainment, education and news. But these days it's all about the viewers. The more people come to YouTube to watch videos and the more time they spend watching videos the more YouTube promotes the creators who succeed at keeping viewers on the platform for longer periods of time. So remember, when creating content, think of the audience you're trying to reach. Think of what content they want to see. Try to understand how to make your content worth watching and worth watching so much that they will watch another of your videos. The longer you keep viewers on your videos, the better your analytics and the better the chances of YouTube promoting your videos.

2) Audio is more important than you think - This is not to say you need a $200 mic when making your videos but if you take yourself as an example of a viewer, ask yourself how often have you skipped over a video because their audio just wasn't worth watching the video? A mic that makes the audio sound like headphones from the 80s or the sounds of the city around you becoming part of your content or even some terrible hissing or high bass audio that distracts from the commenting can make any video cringy enough to be ignored by most. A decent mic, noise-blocking solutions like moving blankets and even some audio editing software like Audacity can make wonders for your audio.

3) Content before subs and views - While I understand that the average YouTuber longs for lots of subscribers and lots of views in order to reach the requirements to be a YouTube partner, you have to understand that growing a channel for most YouTubers is hard work. It takes time and patience to grow a channel. That's why it is essential that as a creator you focus on creating content first, lots of it. If you are to set goals for your channel set a goal for how many videos to create. At a minimum, you should strive to create at least 100 videos in your first year before you should start worrying about subs and views. Think of it as experience. You can't expect a company to consider hiring you if you have little or no experience, by the same token you can't expect YouTube's algorithm to share your content to potential new viewers if you don't have enough content to make it worth YouTube's while to promote you. granted, there are those who defy the inner workings of YouTube's algorithm and become overnight sensations, but bare in mind that every new YouTuber is competing against not only thousands of new YouTubers but also against more mature channels as well. Sometimes you get lucky and you manage to find that perfect recipe to become an overnight sensation, but it can often be a short-lived success if you don't have the experience and the knowledge to repeat that success. So even though you may not be getting views, even though your subscriber base is not growing as fast as you'd like, keep going, keep creating, keep uploading. Learn as you go, improve and don't give up. YouTube may not be for everyone but that doesn't mean you give up so quickly.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
I'm actually going to challenge the opinion of audio... to a degree, and suggest that the messege is more important than the audio. Mostly because I have a video that has HORRIBLE audio, like nearly inaudable, it gets complaints every now and then, but it's one of my top performing videos on my channel, simply because people wanted to know how to draw a trex. Maybe it was the fact it's on an art channel, and people care more about visuals in art, than audio, so maybe my results are unique, but I think you can get away with audio mistakes even from the beginning. Important yes, but I still think the messege is more important. A good strong messege can be delivered with poor audio.

BUT starting with decent audio from the beginning sets you off on a good start.
 

TheHappyKidShow

Familiar Member
TubeBuddy Star
61
10
Subscriber Goal
2000
These are really good points. I'm new to YouTube and content creation and monetization crossed my mind. My kids were watching YouTube videos with kids from their home playing with toys and some sort of visual overlay and sound effect on each scene. Instead of them just watching it, I wanted them to be creative and so I started this channel. In truth, my work sent me home and so I found the time to challenge my kids to be creative and pretend play, eventually making a show out of it. My background is graphic design and I just got into after effects and understand the process of storyboarding and editing.

Anyway, long story short... I'm home now because of the situation we're all facing and I'm just trying to give my kids a little fun and distraction from all of this. I don't have the equipment like a lot of the professionals do. No lights and no mic. I have an Adobe license, a green sheet and a 10 year old Canon camcorder. All I have is just my creativity and I'm really enjoying spending time with my kids.

They love seeing themselves in fantastic scenes, so that bring me joy. At the end of the day, its all about what brings you joy. I guess all of that other stuff like subs, monetization and likes come with it if it connects. But just continue to create if it offers you some sort of peace or outlet or joy.
 

Rick Ace

New Member
12
4
Subscriber Goal
100000
The third point it's like Field of Dreams... Build it and they will come! Keep creating good content and eventually it could pay off. I need to keep this in mind.
 

Travel Interesante

Recognized Member
TubeBuddy Pro
97
10
I'm going to agree with Beanie, with the caveat that I'm actively trying to figure out ways to improve our audio. We made plenty of mistakes as a new creator, with audio being one of the bigger ones. A handful of people mentioned it to us earlier on, but overall I do not think it has slowed us down too much.

Personally, I'd flip 2 and 3 in order of importance (if you even intended to rank it in such a way, ha), but 100% agree that people need to keep #1 in mind when starting a channel. I mentioned it somewhere else, but the best way to view YouTube itself is as a middle man between viewers and content creators. People come to YouTube to watch good content on topic X and YouTube matches that viewer up with a creators content. It is all fine and well to be passionate and make videos about a certain topic, but you always need to keep in mind what a viewer of that topic really wants to see and make it good, so that way YouTube will match it up with the viewers who want it.
 

Ameen

Known Member
TubeBuddy User
111
9
One more point that can be added is they should defund the myths that u get a million subs too.. they should not run behind subs but should provide the best quality content as value and have patience

I have seen many leave youtube when they have 100-600 subs ...they just don't take advantage or learn about seo

Youtube is not about the creator but about the viewer is so true ... utube needs money to run ... views watch ads hence they are important

Also some dumb ppl i have met say youtube success is not possible now but i believe when u do the right thing with right intention u will succeed

All the best to those reading this :)
 
OP
OP
Bravestarr | Team TB

Bravestarr | Team TB

Life ain't no Nintendo Game
Moderator
2,113
24
Subscriber Goal
1000
I'm actually going to challenge the opinion of audio... to a degree, and suggest that the messege is more important than the audio. Mostly because I have a video that has HORRIBLE audio, like nearly inaudable, it gets complaints every now and then, but it's one of my top performing videos on my channel, simply because people wanted to know how to draw a trex. Maybe it was the fact it's on an art channel, and people care more about visuals in art, than audio, so maybe my results are unique, but I think you can get away with audio mistakes even from the beginning. Important yes, but I still think the messege is more important. A good strong messege can be delivered with poor audio.

BUT starting with decent audio from the beginning sets you off on a good start.
There are some exceptions, variables that we haven't calculated, anomalies that we haven't identified yet, technologies we don't understand. Ok, enough with the Star Trek nerd talk. :p

I can agree perhaps it's the fact that your content is art based and thus video quality is just as important if not more important than audio depending on what type of audio accompanies the art.