• Guest - Earn a FREE TubeBuddy Upgrade for being active on the forums! Click Here to learn how you earn free upgrades for TubeBuddy!
  • Guest - TubeBuddy has a discord! Click Here to join in the conversation!

Camera Gear Best Lens For Canon T7i

ASMRSadie

ASMR Sadie
241
11
Subscriber Goal
10000
Does anyone know what the best lens for filming videos on a t7i? I use the standard lens that my camera bundle came with. I have read briefly on google that Canon 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens is a good lens for shooting youtube videos. I'm just wondering if anyone has experience with that lens. Why is it good for videos and is it a good option for vlogging/ASMR videos or is there a better option?
 

Damon

Trusted User
Trusted User
2,779
25
www.blackwarriorlures.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
Well, it depends. From what I remember of your ASMR videos, you're working indoors in a fairly tight space. I believe that the 35mm lens would serve you better than a 50mm. Trust me, I love the 50! But, indoors you'll have to place the camera further way to get a similar field of view as you current setup. If you have a big enough room, then fine, but if not a 24mm, 28mm, or 35mm might be much better for your situation.

Why?

The 50mm will be much more flattering to your face. It's a better "everyday life" lens, but the 35mm is right up there with it. Most street photography is done with a 35mm lens. 50mm is fairly close to what the human eye sees. (40mm is what the human eyes sees if I remember correctly.) Many movies you've seen were shot entirely on 50mm lenses. You know the look, you just didn't know it was called a 50mm lens.

Also don't forget vintage lenses, although adapting vintage glass to Canon EF mount in more difficult than other mounts.

I use a Canon FD 1.8. It's the same lens it was just made back in the 1970s, but I use it mostly as a b-roll/cutway a lens. I would have to place the camera something like 5 feet away from me to get the framing I'd want. That would place the microphone out of reach. So I use the Canon FD 24mm when I'm doing interview portion of my videos.

For vlogging I'd rather have something between the 24 and the 50. How much of the background do you want in the image vs. just your face? That's what it comes down to.

Here's a good example: https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/4164807

Notice the shorter the focal length the more anorexic the models look. The longer the focal length the more flattering the image.
 

Travel Interesante

Recognized Member
TubeBuddy Pro
97
10
I use the 10-18mm EF-S lens for vlogging on my 90d, but I need to fit myself and my wife in the shot, so need to go as wide as possible. Just remember the t7i, is a crop sensor camera as well, so you need to multiply the focal length by 1.6x to get the "full frame" equivalent. It really depends on what you are shooting.
 

Damon

Trusted User
Trusted User
2,779
25
www.blackwarriorlures.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
I've generally found it best to avoid all these "full-frame equivalent" formulas. It doesn't help you know what it's going to look like on your camera. Who cares what the image looks like of a different camera? Remember APS-C is basically Super 35. Super 35 is full frame for filmmakers. What most people call "full-frame" is actually Vista Vision for filmmakers.

For me I like Micro4/3 simply because it gives a field of view close to Super 16 (more like Super 21 or something.) I want to emulate some of the old 16mm documentary films of the 1960s and 1970s. The math goes the other way for me. Add a focal reducer and that makes the math impossible to understand what the "full-frame equivalent" is because Vista Vision is not the film-frame I'm trying to emulate.

So don't get caught up in all these equivalents. Just get used to your camera's frame and what it looks like. If you get a 50mm lens, then your next lens should be like a 24mm. From there get a 100mm lens.

Or if you get a 35mm lens, get a 17mm lens or close to it. Then get an 85mm lens. In other words chop in half or double the focal length. A three lens setup like that will give you every thing you need.

In other words, just get a lens, any lens, then live with that lens until you understand what your camera will and will not do, then buy another lens that complements what you have and adds to your artistic needs. That's why I believe in vintage lenses. You can get an entire set of lenses for $230 to $250 and actually look better than the modern lenses.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
ASMRSadie

ASMRSadie

ASMR Sadie
241
11
Subscriber Goal
10000
Well, it depends. From what I remember of your ASMR videos, you're working indoors in a fairly tight space. I believe that the 35mm lens would serve you better than a 50mm. Trust me, I love the 50! But, indoors you'll have to place the camera further way to get a similar field of view as you current setup. If you have a big enough room, then fine, but if not a 24mm, 28mm, or 35mm might be much better for your situation.

Why?

The 50mm will be much more flattering to your face. It's a better "everyday life" lens, but the 35mm is right up there with it. Most street photography is done with a 35mm lens. 50mm is fairly close to what the human eye sees. (40mm is what the human eyes sees if I remember correctly.) Many movies you've seen were shot entirely on 50mm lenses. You know the look, you just didn't know it was called a 50mm lens.

Also don't forget vintage lenses, although adapting vintage glass to Canon EF mount in more difficult than other mounts.

I use a Canon FD 1.8. It's the same lens it was just made back in the 1970s, but I use it mostly as a b-roll/cutway a lens. I would have to place the camera something like 5 feet away from me to get the framing I'd want. That would place the microphone out of reach. So I use the Canon FD 24mm when I'm doing interview portion of my videos.

For vlogging I'd rather have something between the 24 and the 50. How much of the background do you want in the image vs. just your face? That's what it comes down to.

Here's a good example: https://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/4164807

Notice the shorter the focal length the more anorexic the models look. The longer the focal length the more flattering the image.
Thanks for breaking that down that was actually really helpful. I think I’m going to look into the 24mm as you suggested.

I’m still learning about lenses. Watched some videos on them but just showed several that youtuber used and not really informative as You broke it down.

I use the 10-18mm EF-S lens for vlogging on my 90d, but I need to fit myself and my wife in the shot, so need to go as wide as possible. Just remember the t7i, is a crop sensor camera as well, so you need to multiply the focal length by 1.6x to get the "full frame" equivalent. It really depends on what you are shooting.
Ok thanks I will keep that in mind. I didn’t even know that about multiplying the focal length by 1.6x to get the full frame. I mainly just shoot myself up-close.

I've generally found it best to avoid all these "full-frame equivalent" formulas. It doesn't help you know what it's going to look like on your camera. Who cares what the image looks like of a different camera? Remember APS-C is basically Super 35. Super 35 is full frame for filmmakers. What most people call "full-frame" is actually Vista Vision for filmmakers.

For me I like Micro4/3 simply because it gives a field of view close to Super 16 (more like Super 21 or something.) I want to emulate some of the old 16mm documentary films of the 1960s and 1970s. The math goes the other way for me. Add a focal reducer and that makes the math impossible to understand what the "full-frame equivalent" is because Vista Vision is not the film-frame I'm trying to emulate.

So don't get caught up in all these equivalents. Just get used to your camera's frame and what it looks like. If you get a 50mm lens, then your next lens should be like a 24mm. From there get a 100mm lens.

Or if you get a 35mm lens, get a 17mm lens or close to it. Then get an 85mm lens. In other words chop in half or double the focal length. A three lens setup like that will give you every thing you need.

In other words, just get a lens, any lens, then live with that lens until you understand what your camera will and will not do, then buy another lens that complements what you have and adds to your artistic needs. That's why I believe in vintage lenses. You can get an entire set of lenses for $230 to $250 and actually look better than the modern lenses.
Ok I think I might look into the 50mm then try a 24mm after I’ve worked with it for a bit. I might look into a vintage one. Do you know what they would be called on amazon? Would I just search for a 24mm vintage lens?
 

Damon

Trusted User
Trusted User
2,779
25
www.blackwarriorlures.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
Sorry, I didn't get back to you. These vintage lenses are only available used on places like Ebay. Plus, you have to buy an adapter to fit the old mount to the new mount. For adapter you'd have to go to a company like: https://fotodioxpro.com/.

So, yeah, get on Ebay and search for vintage lenses. Search YouTube for people who are adapting these old lenses to new cameras before you start buying.

Check out Mark's video on these. He has done a great job teaching how to adapt old lenses to new cameras:
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3qfPlyGmc8
 
Last edited: