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YouTube Question Should I have copyright disclaimer on my videos

Roudari

New Member
7
4
Hey!

I have Rocksmith 2014 gaming channel... Almost all of my videos are copyright claimed, as they should be since I am playing music from various artists and not my own stuff. This is not my problem tho.

Should I have some kind of disclaimer or something on my videos stating that I don't own the copyright for the sound? It should be obvious that I don't and the claim comes instantly after uploading the video.

Wondering about this because I don't want to get in to any problems just because I didn't have a short text in my descriptions.

My channel in case someone wants to see what my content looks like: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpZwxnXabtAvfWEew91FKJw
 

Craig Payne

Known Member
165
10
There is no point. They are a waste of time. They do nothing. They do not protect you from claims.

HOWEVER, it is polite and good etiquette to acknowledge whose content that you have used.
 
OP
OP
Roudari

Roudari

New Member
7
4
Yeah, I am not looking for "protection from claims" or anything like that. I am not trying to steal.

But thanks, if it's good etiquette, then I think I will add some kind of notice thing.
 

AurigaDave

Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
149
13
www.astronomyshows4schools.co.uk
Subscriber Goal
5000
I always put 'with thanks to....' at the end of my videos where I have used material I know the origin of, it is courteous and IMHO good Practice. I try and avoid copyright music. and of course you cannot monetize anything with a copyright claim on it.
 
OP
OP
Roudari

Roudari

New Member
7
4
Thanks for all the comments, but I feel like none of You actually checked or understood what rocksmith is about. I can't avoid using other peoples music. That's literally what rocksmith is all about. Kind of Guitar hero but with real instrument. Also I know I can't monetize these videos and I don't even want to. I don't think the bands I am playing will get any revenue from my videos, but I sure hope they do...

I think I will just do what I have been doing, list the original band I am playing in title/description.
 

blackbeltsecrets

BlackBeltBarrister
284
15
www.blackbeltbarrister.com
Subscriber Goal
1000000
Whichever way you look at it, using content that you do not own is against copyright law if you do have have a licence to publish it and at the extreme, they could take you to court for all sorts of things (not least of which being the costs of taking you to court.) This is usually unlikely unless you publish it in such a way to annoy them, of course. As for YouTube, it will always be a ticking bomb when you use someone else's protected content.
Source: I'm an IP Barrister!
 

AurigaDave

Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
149
13
www.astronomyshows4schools.co.uk
Subscriber Goal
5000
Whichever way you look at it, using content that you do not own is against copyright law if you do have have a licence to publish it.
Source: I'm an IP Barrister!
So True, fortunately there is a lot of open source stuff in my field of work, but for some unless you actually take the footage/make the music you ARE open to a legal challenge...PS (I have worked as a pro-photographer in the past) it is NOT true that IF you photograph or film a copyrighted work you can get around it ...you cannot film a production in a theatre or a film on TV and put it online without breaking copyright (this is why you get all the legal stuff at end/in the theatre).
This is I am sure Blackbeltsecrets would agree most applicable if your video does harm to the owner...a film saying 'X' product is bad etc
 

blackbeltsecrets

BlackBeltBarrister
284
15
www.blackbeltbarrister.com
Subscriber Goal
1000000
Yes
So True, fortunately there is a lot of open source stuff in my field of work, but for some unless you actually take the footage/make the music you ARE open to a legal challenge...PS (I have worked as a pro-photographer in the past) it is NOT true that IF you photograph or film a copyrighted work you can get around it ...you cannot film a production in a theatre or a film on TV and put it online without breaking copyright (this is why you get all the legal stuff at end/in the theatre).
This is I am sure Blackbeltsecrets would agree most applicable if your video does harm to the owner...a film saying 'X' product is bad etc
Yes, that's right.

Strictly speaking, when you make a new film and include someone else's copyright, you are creating new copyright in the film, audio and production of the film you make; BUT if that film is found to be infringing someone else's copyright and you make money from your film, THEY are entitled to the profits made from YOUR copyright because it infringes theirs. The extent to which this is relevant is down to the courts to decide. For example, if a video becomes popular but the only thing about it that people like is music that belongs to someone else, the chances are they will get 100% of the royalties.
The common scenario these days (in terms of YouTube) is that covers are being offered "revenue share" where the original copyright owner gets the lion share of the royalties.
 

Manofgod91

New Member
21
5
Lol no one understands what the OP is saying. Let me translate for him:

The videos he makes is of him playing a guitar to a real song in a video game. If you divorce the videogame from the guitar, its just a regular guitar channel. If you divorce the guitar from the videogame, the videogame is impossible to play, because the guitar IS the controller for the videogame. He is NOT using other peoples content. Its no different then streaming a Call of Duty Modern Warfare trailer with Metallica playing in the background. He isnt using metallica or adding it to his videos, its in the trailer he is streaming.

OP, I wish I could answer your question :X
 

Jeffrey Powers

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Legend
234
16
geekazine.com
OK @Roudari - here is my take on it. And yes - I DO know what Rocksmith is.

I think a disclaimer is a GREAT idea. It shows you acknowledge their song. I would state intentions - examples could be:
  • "I'm having fun and learning"
  • "I love these songs"
  • "Go visit their webpage or YouTube channel"...

You are labeling it as a gaming video, and stating that it's Rocksmith. It doesn't allow you any revenue for YouTube, but Rocksmith could see you as an influencer, and work with you in other ways.

And By labeling the game, you are complying with YouTube TOS. It doesn't protect you from takedown notices, but you are also less likely to get your channel taken down because of these videos.

Promotion is all a band wants sometimes. I would take it further by finding ways to tag the band more.
  1. If the band's YT page has a custom URL, you can @ it on your description now. Do that
    1. @Band-Name
    2. You can always do @UClxjm6JR5j7Wc_uP20OjUCA (this is Everclear's page) - eventually, YouTube will start linking pages this way.
  2. If they didn't claim a URL, then copy/paste their YT channel longURL in the description
    1. Rammstein doesn't have one, so in the description, use: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYp3rk70ACGXQ4gFAiMr1SQ
A band with a good social media manager will see that and could do things like feature you on their pages

Hashtags are good, I would take out the 2014 in #rocksmith2014. Make sure you have tags of both Rocksmith and Rocksmith 2014.

I would suggest adding these hashtags in rotation - #gameplay #learningtoplay #Bass #playbass

Have fun with your bass playing!