YouTube Question How much YT income!? Help us understand

Core Freedom

Newbie Member
How does this work??

A 24 year old from Romania makes over $780K per year from Youtube (according to Socialblade), with videos that are not even his!

His channel details:
  • 105 video uploads
  • 5,790,000 subscribers
  • 258,529,855 video views
  • $48.9K - $782.5K yearly earnings
  • 98.8K Facebook fans
  • 554 Twitter followers
  • 17.8K Instagram followers
Questions:
  1. How can a channel earn money with video content from other people?
    • He takes famous people's speeches and overlays them onto background videos he buys from royalty free sources. He also ads background audio, which he buys from royalty free sources.
  2. How does his channel not get flagged for copyright violations but instead his channel received the Content Creator designation?
    • His video descriptions say: "►Copyright disclaimer: We own a comercial license for all the content used in this video." This may apply for Videoblocks and Audiojungle but what about the actual speech of the speaker? Isn't this the main content of the video and therefore monetization would go to the speaker, not the channel owner?
  3. How does he have this much income without having created any of the content himself (he's merely editing other people's speeches into shorter versions)?
    • I was under the impression that when content is taken from others, monetization goes to them, not the channel owner.
His website states: "I'm a 24-year-old video editor from Romania. I'm passionate about self-development and I created "Be Inspired" with the mission and hope of motivating and helping anybody who is going through a difficult time."

The reason I ask these questions is because I tried to get my channel to be a Content Creator channel, which was rejected by Youtube, even though I create all of my own content, even the background music is my own, although I do purchase my videos from royalty free sources. I turned off my monetization a long time ago for several reasons, one being that when my videos would get flagged for copyright violations (even though I initially purchased all of my background music and all copyrights were eventually lifted), monetization would go to the person who owned the background music, even though the music had nothing to do with the video, which I created from scratch.

What are your thoughts on how this type of success can be achieved with other people's content?
 
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Poulpc

Newbie Member
TubeBuddy User
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($48.9K - $782.5K yearly earnings) he is not making $780K per year, this is a best case scenario, where every single click on his video shows the maximum amount of money from the highest paying ads on YouTube
social Blade is not taking into account if his videos are getting copyright claim by the copyright owners, they purely work off the numbers

many copyright owners let's you have there content in your video, but all ad Revenue will go to the content owner and not you
 
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Core Freedom

Core Freedom

Newbie Member
I understand that and that's exactly what my experience was. That doesn't answer how he was approved for a Content Creator channel or why his entire channel is filled with other people's material. If all monetization would go to those speakers, he would technically speaking earn exactly $0, which is not the case.

Maybe I'm missing something... :thinking:
 

Poulpc

Newbie Member
TubeBuddy User
57
7
Subscriber Goal
100000
I know nothing about Content Creator channel, and how to get one, or how he got one
but I know the socialblade numbers of what people are making, is purely based on the the stats on a channel, social Blade knows nothing about if all his videos are copyright claimed and he made $0
 

Andrew

Superman
Administrator
5,815
31
youtube.com
Subscriber Goal
5000
How does this work??

A 24 year old from Romania makes over $780K per year from Youtube (according to Socialblade), with videos that are not even his!

His channel details:
  • 105 video uploads
  • 5,790,000 subscribers
  • 258,529,855 video views
  • $48.9K - $782.5K yearly earnings
  • 98.8K Facebook fans
  • 554 Twitter followers
  • 17.8K Instagram followers
Questions:
  1. How can a channel earn money with video content from other people?
    • He takes famous people's speeches and overlays them onto background videos he buys from royalty free sources. He also ads background audio, which he buys from royalty free sources.
  2. How does his channel not get flagged for copyright violations but instead his channel received the Content Creator designation?
    • His video descriptions say: "►Copyright disclaimer: We own a comercial license for all the content used in this video." This may apply for Videoblocks and Audiojungle but what about the actual speech of the speaker? Isn't this the main content of the video and therefore monetization would go to the speaker, not the channel owner?
  3. How does he have this much income without having created any of the content himself (he's merely editing other people's speeches into shorter versions)?
    • I was under the impression that when content is taken from others, monetization goes to them, not the channel owner.
His website states: "I'm a 24-year-old video editor from Romania. I'm passionate about self-development and I created "Be Inspired" with the mission and hope of motivating and helping anybody who is going through a difficult time."

The reason I ask these questions is because I tried to get my channel to be a Content Creator channel, which was rejected by Youtube, even though I create all of my own content, even the background music is my own, although I do purchase my videos from royalty free sources. I turned off my monetization a long time ago for several reasons, one being that when my videos would get flagged for copyright violations (even though I initially purchased all of my background music and all copyrights were eventually lifted), monetization would go to the person who owned the background music, even though the music had nothing to do with the video, which I created from scratch.

What are your thoughts on how this type of success can be achieved with other people's content?
Social blades estimates are just that estimates. They don't tell you if he's monetizing, if he has deals with these creators, if he is running ads, or if he's making money else where.

A lot of people use this as an editing demo to get more professional work, and the videos do well due to the large named speakers. I'd say this is a great example of someone who has built a portfolio to get other work, and showcase their editing skills are great. To answer your questions, I'd say you're assuming A LOT on the money based on the estimate from social blade.

You also have no proof he ISN'T getting copyright hits.

That said, without asking him we will never truly know, but I would say the estimated earnings on Social blade are off.

I make A LOT of money through affiliates and brand deals, but that's not reflected, so it's all just perspective :)

I hope that makes sense!
 
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Core Freedom

Core Freedom

Newbie Member
That makes total sense, Andrew. I'm not as much interested on the money part, neither from Youtube, nor from his affiliates or any other deals. Although I am interested if or why a channel can be monetized when none of the content is how own. As far as Socialblade is concerned, they do pick up when someone turns off their monetization. Mine is turned off for several reasons, and Socialblade does report this accurately.

I'm more interested in the overall concept of creating a channel with other people's contents and being able to get Content Creator status and this many followers. If he did get copyright claims on all of his videos his channel would have gotten shot down a long time ago, but instead he made Content Creator status, which is baffling to me. I'm trying to learn from this example and understand what the technicalities and legalities are for such a channel to even exist.
 

Andrew

Superman
Administrator
5,815
31
youtube.com
Subscriber Goal
5000
That makes total sense, Andrew. I'm not as much interested on the money part, neither from Youtube, nor from his affiliates or any other deals. Although I am interested if or why a channel can be monetized when none of the content is how own. As far as Socialblade is concerned, they do pick up when someone turns off their monetization. Mine is turned off for several reasons, and Socialblade does report this accurately.

I'm more interested in the overall concept of creating a channel with other people's contents and being able to get Content Creator status and this many followers. If he did get copyright claims on all of his videos his channel would have gotten shot down a long time ago, but instead he made Content Creator status, which is baffling to me. I'm trying to learn from this example and understand what the technicalities and legalities are for such a channel to even exist.
Copyright claims and strikes are not the same things. A strike would take down his channel claims let him keep it up, but he gets no revenue. I'd say it'd be easy for that to be the case where they are aware, but claim revenue. A lot of fan-based content has this happen :)
 
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Core Freedom

Core Freedom

Newbie Member
I understand this but it still doesn't answer the question how he got a Content Creator channel, which would be impossible if that were the case. I tried to get Content Creator status with my own content and was denied. Youtube didn't give me a reason and simply said to try again in 6 months. It seems difficult to get straight answers from Youtube directly.
 

Poulpc

Newbie Member
TubeBuddy User
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100000
i looked in to the eligibility requirements for the Creators Program, which you can find here Link https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/7018621?hl=en
"To be considered active, you have to have uploaded videos on at least two different days during the past three months. The videos you upload must be public videos."
from what I can see your last upload was 8 months ago, that could be why you didn't get accepted
 
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vano

New User
1
2
Hey can I get his channel link? I want to use duqqy to analyze his channel for more detailed income ;)
 
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Core Freedom

Core Freedom

Newbie Member
i looked in to the eligibility requirements for the Creators Program, which you can find here Link https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/7018621?hl=en
"To be considered active, you have to have uploaded videos on at least two different days during the past three months. The videos you upload must be public videos."
from what I can see your last upload was 8 months ago, that could be why you didn't get accepted
That's correct except that was around 2-3 years ago when I posted regularly. I stopped posting for this particular reason (and personal reasons as my dad got sick with cancer), and to figure out how to move forward with my channel. I'm now ready to move forward (dad has passed away) but I want to be careful in growing my channel right. So for now I'm doing a lot of research and I'm finding some of the most interesting tactics that people are using to grow not just one channel, but several channels (with the same videos!).

Fascinating!

Thank you all for commenting. Together we can learn and help each other grow in the right direction.
 

Damon

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
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www.blackwarriorlures.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
Yeah, at the end of the day it's impossible to see the complete picture this side of their channel/business. The only way is to ask them directly. You never really know what someone is doing or how they're doing it. And you may not want to know.

I've seen a Sci-Fi film channel that buys, procures short films from filmmakers and uses their channel as the SyFy channel does on T.V. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7sDT8jZ76VLV1u__krUutA

That's one way. The other way is to use archival footage from US archive--assuming you're in the US. Lots of history and educational channels do this, especially space exploration channels.

With 33k subs, just start building again, and don't worry about other's channels. It's best to take the long road.
 
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