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Seeking Advice what is your thought process of making videos.

BraveStarrTG

Life Is A Game
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As a gamer my thought process is usually recording a good game, trying to get the best parts into my video while making it extremely short because long gaming videos with too much time of doing nothing in them are not very popular. I use cool situations from other recordings as my intro and outros and I try my best to find that one scene in the game that best describes the title of my video based on the gameplay. Normally coming up with thumbnails and titles before I get the footage is different when it's about gaming because I depend on how my gameplay goes in order to decide if I am gonna make a game video and since I'm not a hardcore, pro player, getting good gameplay footage can often take time for me.
 

RazzBarlow

Member
TubeBuddy Pro
104
12
I sit down with my channel partners once a month. We "spitball" and throw out ideas for videos and make a list. Then we throw out the ridiculous ones and look at the list again. The ones that seem most viable are the ones we concentrate on first. Then we work out a filming schedule. Our goal is to have a video out on every Tuesday. We start planning for the next video on Wednesday. The most time consuming part for me is the editing. It generally takes me most of one day to edit a video. I had a stated goal of wanting a backlog of 2 or 3 videos "in the can" in case we didn't get one ready for a particular week. I haven't been able to do that yet, in months of trying.
We try to make content that we find funny, entertaining or informative. If we like it, we assume our viewers will too.
 

Damon

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
I like to research an idea for good solid well-searched, low-traffic terms as well, but I have also found that this way gets me off track. Once you've established what you're known for and you find that "all-elusive" search term and make a video or even a videos series, if it falls too much outside of what you're known for it can sill fall flat.

My multi-species fly fishing series was a great example. I'm known as the guy who fishes without rod and reel, but this search term was too good at the time to pass up. So, I started 2019 with a whole new series about multispecies fly fishing. The whole thing fell flat. Once I got back to my juggin series and mud motor building, numbers shot back up.

It should have worked. I fishing for multi-species with and without rod and reel, but that isn't perception of my audience. Although the search terms were perfect at the time, it was a different audience, really.

Always ask what are you known for and what does your established audience want to see? If you don;t have an established audience or don't have anything that you're known for, that's where you need to start. That's starts with soldi SEO skills.

For me it always comes down to the fact they was to see realistic fishing methods shot in a documentary style that reminds them of films like A River Runs Through It, or old T.V. shows like The Waltons: something old, country and rustic with a touch of National Geographic.

That reminds me of the current series I'm shooting called Mud Runners. I'm also known for building, hot-rodding and blowing up Thailand longtail outboards. I've really neglected that audience because I wasn't able to get sponsorships. But people still sign up to my How to Convert your Thai Longtail to A Marine Gas Tank ebook/class on my Teachable page. It's an audience that still grows even though I've neglected it! HELLO, GENIUS!

But see I have a stable of keywords always at the ready for that audience. Since I dont need to fish that often, building, running and exploring the river with that Thai longtail is still a great way for me to build an audience.

All that to say you need to find keywords and do proper SEO, but at some point, you will to hit something. Build on that something. Be sure not to neglect your audience in the long run. Despite making mistakes, I've still managed to build over 5k subs. @Andrew teaches this every single day!
 
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Beanie Draws

Moderator
Moderator
I first research an idea before I ever commit it to script. The reason is, if I want to make a video and no one else is looking for it, I might need to find a way to shape it in ways people are. Then Once I have found a term, I go from there!
I very rarely do that and I really should.

I make my videos really selfishy. I assume people subscribe to me because they want to see what i’m creating. Half of it is to teach them something. But the other half is to entertain them with my creative inventions.

a lot of my videos aren’t actually focused on a search result, it’s more based on “I really feel like drawing what I think Godzilla would look like if it’s fused with a dinosaur”and then I draw that, and try to present it in a way that people will find interesting if they see the thumbnail and try to keep it entertaining to watch for more than 15-30 seconds.

Then there are those times times people frequently request a dinosaur. So I ask myself, do I want to draw it, or will it bore me? If it bores me, it’s not going to make for a good video because my passion won’t be there. If it’s a suggestion. I like, THEN i go in for it.

I don’t ever really search topics though, I more think what i’d Like to see (the whole point of my channel was selfishly doing what i’d Wish others would do, so I did it instead) if there’s a topic that interests me as an artist, and I think it’ll also help others, then I’ll tackle it.

and I’ll tackle “trends” (Godzilla, Jurassic Park/world) and I’ll take on suggestions :)
 
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Damon

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TubeBuddy Pro
Beanie, you're on to something. Not everything is an algorithmic, numbers based, data driven, Vulcan logic, Terminator executing mountain of doom. The whole purpose of art is to stir the soul. The algorithm can do nothing more that chart what happens after said souls has been stirred. While they can tell you how people's souls have been stirred over a certain period of time in the past, they can't really tell you how to stir people's souls now and into the future, per se.

That's why they are computers and we are humans. You were born with a talent that doesn't "need" the algorithm. That's something people a rarely talk about. Not everyone is like that. Most people heavily "need" the algorithm because that the only advantage they have.

For me I really want my fishing videos to be like mini documentary films, but I'm no Nat Geo photographer like Jimmy Chin. Mine are simple, slice-of-life portraits of an aspiring adventurer, fishing tackle maker. The topics themselves are not popular, generally speaking, yet there is a growing fan base. The fan base started growing when I started making these documentary film-like shorts of my fishing adventures and tackle-making exploits.

While I do spend time trying to research before hand, I often will get off track because I found some great and awesome keyword that has nothing to do with what I have been known for, and it falls flat.

In other words there is another side to the coin: You have to make content that your known for and, well, it's kind of like oxygen: The thing that keeping you a life is also killing you. Think of how a rubber band deteriorates when exposed to the air for too long.

For instance how to new keywords phrases get created? People, creators make them. When I started I could hardly find anything worth searching in terms of Thai longtail outboards, or hand line fishing, yet over the past five years I'm finding more and more searchable keywords. And in every one of those keywords my videos are showing up somewhere.

The algorithm can only tell you what happens after the fact.
 
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Damon

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
Sorry for the double post, but I figured I chop this up into a couple points instead one ginormic wall of text.

It also depends on whether your primary content is help, hub or hero content. My primary content is now hero content. That's the content they want to see. Again documentary-like mini film following our hero as he tries to feed himself by fishing, "Juggin'!," fight diabetes, "Sugar, Fly," keep his outboard motors from blowing up, "Mud Runner," while trying to develop the perfect fishing system, my up coming series "Hand Line Fishing For Blue Catfish, tentative title."

This is what I'm calling father content. Father content is the content from which everything else is derived. Instead of thinking of hero, help and hub content as all different, separate and adding to the grind, it's much easier to have a primary type of content for your channel. For me it's hero. For someone else it's help, like a cooking channel or something. The father content is that content that marries to or spawns, fertilizes, hatches or creates the other forms of content.

I've seen this used on the Great British Baking Show. It's a competition cooking show that follows a band of amature bakers as they vie for the title of Britain's greatest amature baker. Each week they compete in an ever increasingly difficult bake off with one contestant losing and booted of the show, and another crowned as star baker of the week.

By definition that is hero content. But the recipes are very difficult, truly professional recipes. Often the judges will do a separate master class showing the T.V. audience how to do the recipes correctly. By definition that is help content. They didn't have to shoot a whole new show, they just expounded on content that has already been created. In other words the father content married to the help content. Or the mother content that gave birth to the child content.

In my newest Mud Runner series, I had to replace the powerhead of my mud motor. The whole story was the removal, replacement, testing and break in of my new powerhead. From that I shot quick tutorial of a particularly difficult to remove part, the coupling. In reality it only took one extra shot, just me explaining it better for a tutorial video. The footage of actually removing it had already been shot in the hero content, so I got two videos from one piece of content. Saves time and gets content out like a mad dog.

In post production I cut it much differently, so it looks very different than the hero content, but that doesn't matter. it also served as hub content as a subscriber had recently asked how to remove that part. One piece of content provided three services to my audience.
 
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Beanie Draws

Moderator
Moderator
It’s interesting that you mention help, hub and hero content. I’ve kinda forgotten what “hub” content is... I guess that’s what “normal”.”self serving” content is? The content made for the creator rather than the audience? This year I haven’t had the time or the emotional energy to do my normal “help” content, and i’ve Focused on the occasional “hero” content, but mostly it’s been tentpole events and I guess “hub” content.

I need to focus back on the help content and mix it with tentpole
 

Damon

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
Na, hub content is about the audience itself. It's about binding the audience together to make a tribe. It's about getting the audience to talk to one another without me. For instance this whole forum is one big piece of hub content.
 
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