Seeking Advice Difficult for New YouTubers to Gain an Audience?

Snowyamur

Newbie Member
109
39
9
#1
So, I've had my YouTube channel for about two months now, starting back in July, and when I look at other, new YouTube channels that started in late August to early September, those channels are substantially larger than mine.

I'm not sure if it's because my channel is dedicated to gameplay videos, if I'm doing something wrong, if I'm not doing something right, or if I'm too headlong into a competitive environment without anything to support me. I believe that in time my channel can grow, but will it grow if I consistently upload high-quality videos that no one watches? I'm a little bit on the urge of giving up here because if progress isn't being made on something, I feel that it isn't worth my time.

Besides, as I have told another fellow YouTuber here, focusing on subscriber count should not be the main focus; it should be your consistency and activity on your own channel, and I still abide by that principal. However, could it be that today, it's just too difficult for channels like mine to gain a public audience?

Do I need to advertise more? Would I need to network, and how would I do that? Should I switch to another subject of interest on my channel? Should I just give up?

Let me know what you guys think because I'm stumped.
 
Likes: Timelord Miff
OP
OP
Snowyamur

Snowyamur

Newbie Member
109
39
9
#2
What are you doing that the other zillions doing the same thing are not doing?
You need to be unique.
I mean, it isn't just uniqueness. I also think that people who are consistently active with their channel also do well. You can be the most unique channel in the world for what you do and not grow because you're too lazy to make any effort to improve or grow the content of your channel.
 
Likes: Damon

devjani biswas

Newbie Member
TubeBuddy Pro
36
18
7
m.facebook.com
#3
So, I've had my YouTube channel for about two months now, starting back in July, and when I look at other, new YouTube channels that started in late August to early September, those channels are substantially larger than mine.

I'm not sure if it's because my channel is dedicated to gameplay videos, if I'm doing something wrong, if I'm not doing something right, or if I'm too headlong into a competitive environment without anything to support me. I believe that in time my channel can grow, but will it grow if I consistently upload high-quality videos that no one watches? I'm a little bit on the urge of giving up here because if progress isn't being made on something, I feel that it isn't worth my time.

Besides, as I have told another fellow YouTuber here, focusing on subscriber count should not be the main focus; it should be your consistency and activity on your own channel, and I still abide by that principal. However, could it be that today, it's just too difficult for channels like mine to gain a public audience?

Do I need to advertise more? Would I need to network, and how would I do that? Should I switch to another subject of interest on my channel? Should I just give up?

Let me know what you guys think because I'm stumped.
Absolutely.
I completely agree with you. Concentrate on contents and maintaining consistency is something we can control. Gaining subscriber will come by as keep doing good work.
 
Likes: Damon
OP
OP
Snowyamur

Snowyamur

Newbie Member
109
39
9
#4
Absolutely.
I completely agree with you. Concentrate on contents and maintaining consistency is something we can control. Gaining subscriber will come by as keep doing good work.
Yeah, well, I just hope something on my channel improves in due time or else there wouldn't be a reason for me to continue.
 
Likes: Damon

Damon

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy User
#5
Crank out content for two or three years, then ask this question. Yes, I know of one channel that started this summer and now have over 300k, :eek: , but that doesn't mean that I should be growing that fast. You can't compare yourself to other YouTube channels. Two months is not enough time.

The real test is are you willing to do this over the long haul without seeing much result? Just how important is your base content? Do you have enough life experience to offer something new and fresh? Can you do something other than video games like basket making, burp on demand, draw, build kites, skateboard, tree climb, lift weights, regurgitate on demand, build computers, paint, cut grass, wash dishes, cook, eat, ride bicycles, hiking, camping, mountain climbing, mountain biking, fishing, hunting, sports, engineering, building, carpentry, plumbing, dry walling, pipe fitting, writing, gardening, auto repair, tree trimming?

What real life skills have you developed that will make the world a less depressing for the human race? (A better place is what people would normally say, but that's so cliche.)

Do you have any interests other than videos games, things you've always wanted to learn? If the world were perfect, what would you do? (If video games is your answer, then you've missed the point.)

Sadly I don't see enough life experience in most people videos. No real life, school of hard knocks, dirt chewing, grit toothed life experience meant to help people take the :poop:, :skull:, :eyes: and :imp: out of life. If you can do that then you have something to :sun:, :party:, :idea:, :zzz:, :heart: about. When you have that, then you will gain subscribers over time. Maybe not even a big audience, but a dedicated audience nonetheless.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Snowyamur

Snowyamur

Newbie Member
109
39
9
#6
Crank out content for two or three years, then ask this question. Yes, I know of one channel that started this summer and now have over 300k, :eek: , but that doesn't mean that I should be growing that fast. You can't compare yourself to other YouTube channels. Two months is not enough time.

The real test is are you willing to do this over the long haul without seeing much result? Just how important is your base content? Do you have enough life experience to offer something new and fresh? Can you do something other than video games like basket making, burp on demand, draw, build kites, skateboard, tree climb, lift weights, regurgitate on demand, build computers, paint, cut grass, wash dishes, cook, eat, ride bicycles, hiking, camping, mountain climbing, mountain biking, fishing, hunting, sports, engineering, building, carpentry, plumbing, dry walling, pipe fitting, writing, gardening, auto repair, tree trimming?

What real life skills have you developed that will make the world a less depressing for the human race? (A better place is what people would normally say, but that's so cliche.)

Do you have any interests other than videos games, things you've always wanted to learn? If the world were perfect, what would you do? (If video games is your answer, then you've missed the point.)

Sadly I don't see enough life experience in most people videos. No real life, school of hard knocks, dirt chewing, grit toothed life experience meant to help people take the :poop:, :skull:, :eyes: and :imp: out of life. If you can do that then you have something to :sun:, :party:, :idea:, :zzz:, :heart: about. When you have that, then you will gain subscribers over time. Maybe not even a big audience, but a dedicated audience nonetheless.
All I wish to see is improvement over time. If I have my channel for a year and have hundreds of videos, but nothing changes, than at that point I give up. Doesn't make sense why my channel would stay the way it is now after one year of commitment and no changes.
 

Andrew

Superman
Administrator
3,534
2,303
31
youtube.com
#11
So, I've had my YouTube channel for about two months now, starting back in July, and when I look at other, new YouTube channels that started in late August to early September, those channels are substantially larger than mine.

I'm not sure if it's because my channel is dedicated to gameplay videos, if I'm doing something wrong, if I'm not doing something right, or if I'm too headlong into a competitive environment without anything to support me. I believe that in time my channel can grow, but will it grow if I consistently upload high-quality videos that no one watches? I'm a little bit on the urge of giving up here because if progress isn't being made on something, I feel that it isn't worth my time.

Besides, as I have told another fellow YouTuber here, focusing on subscriber count should not be the main focus; it should be your consistency and activity on your own channel, and I still abide by that principal. However, could it be that today, it's just too difficult for channels like mine to gain a public audience?

Do I need to advertise more? Would I need to network, and how would I do that? Should I switch to another subject of interest on my channel? Should I just give up?

Let me know what you guys think because I'm stumped.
I have a gaming channel, and what I learned is most people search for games they love, and a lot of people provide content for it. It's a combination of finding games you want to play, and then make them searchable, and able to stand out. IT took me 2 years before I got any form of success on my channel, but what I focused on, was having fun, and involving my audience every step of the way. If I got one comment, I featured it, showing I listen and include them. I also ask A LOT of questions. That helped too.

Remember this, and ask yourself. "Why did I start this channel? What value do I want to leave my viewer with?" Then it's up to YOU to decide if you are doing that :)
 

jy95

Newbie Member
13
0
7
#12
@Andrew : Same for me XD
Even when I released videos about not so well known games ( guns gore and cannoli / guns gore and cannoli 2 / etc ) close to their release date , after a few months , they are still close to 20-100 views ^^

For example it is my top 10 playlists (even with concurrency ^^) :

 
OP
OP
Snowyamur

Snowyamur

Newbie Member
109
39
9
#13
@Andrew : Same for me XD
Even when I released videos about not so well known games ( guns gore and cannoli / guns gore and cannoli 2 / etc ) close to their release date , after a few months , they are still close to 20-100 views ^^

For example it is my top 10 playlists (even with concurrency ^^) :

I would like to congratulate you on the consistency over time, but when it comes to how well your YouTube channel is doing, watch time matters because that shows how much your audience watches your videos, and whether they enjoy them or not, at the end of the day, your content is being watched. That's more important than views because views only show who clicked on your videos, not how long they watched them.
 

Damon

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy User
#14
@Snowyamur, I've dealt with that just this week. I was doing much more camera commentary videos. I noticed an order of magnitude more views. But after a couple weeks, I took a hard look at the data, comparing my well made fishing adventure documentaries to my quick-and-dirty-talking-head camera videos. No comparison. People would maybe get through 30 seconds and quit watching. It simply wasn't interesting to them.

With my fishing adventure documentaries, they're watching the whole video. I sent a question via community tab directly to my audience asking them their opinion. They confirmed everything the data was telling me. They don't care about the camera videos. And the camera people were just complaining and fighting over little things that I cared not talking about anyway.

For me I'm done chasing views. Watch time and retention is where the channel is growing. I want people to watch my content and get hooked, not watch and get bored in 30 seconds flat. I'm still on track based on the projections I made a year ago. By December of this year I should be close to 5,000 subscribers. I'm north of 4,500 I will consider that objective complete.
 

jy95

Newbie Member
13
0
7
#15
@Snowyamur The thing I wanted to show on this screenshot that only famous (old) games may work whereas other failed ^^
Sadly that youtube doesn't have a clear "sort by" the average watch time ( watch time by view) on their report ...
 
4
1
3
#16
Not to be rude or anything but I think you guys just gave general advice which is still valuable but that everyone knows stay consist make good content etc.. But I wouldnt know if you guys gave his channel a look or not but if you did I see some holes which isnt bad at all my first videos(had a previous gaming channel and my second video got 22k views and had other success in my other videos just lost interest in games in general so stopped) weren't the best either But @Snowyamur I would say this I know your putting in the effort I see the 30 min long videos lots of them maybe try switching it up it takes a lot for a person to watch something that long, cut up the videos and focus on the more entertaining parts or parts you find interesting within the game maybe make more enticing thumbnails as well you have a good voice and your video quality is just as good as any big youtuber and as far as exposure for your channel to help grow well im looking for the same so no advice on that good luck.
 
Last edited:
OP
OP
Snowyamur

Snowyamur

Newbie Member
109
39
9
#17
@Snowyamur, I've dealt with that just this week. I was doing much more camera commentary videos. I noticed an order of magnitude more views. But after a couple weeks, I took a hard look at the data, comparing my well made fishing adventure documentaries to my quick-and-dirty-talking-head camera videos. No comparison. People would maybe get through 30 seconds and quit watching. It simply wasn't interesting to them.

With my fishing adventure documentaries, they're watching the whole video. I sent a question via community tab directly to my audience asking them their opinion. They confirmed everything the data was telling me. They don't care about the camera videos. And the camera people were just complaining and fighting over little things that I cared not talking about anyway.

For me I'm done chasing views. Watch time and retention is where the channel is growing. I want people to watch my content and get hooked, not watch and get bored in 30 seconds flat. I'm still on track based on the projections I made a year ago. By December of this year I should be close to 5,000 subscribers. I'm north of 4,500 I will consider that objective complete.
That's what's interesting, though. It's common that people stop watching things out of losing interest, so we have to keep "evolving" by providing newer content to attract a wider audience. Overtime, I feel like we grow and become more experienced not only understanding what brings a crowd in, but what keeps them in their place. That's what many huge YouTubers had to go through, and they grew over time with what they do because they learned and understood how to appeal to their audience.

Positive consistency is the key to success with YouTube, not one-hit wonders.

Not to be rude or anything but I think you guys just gave general advice which is still valuable but that everyone knows stay consist make good content etc.. But I wouldnt know if you guys gave his channel a look or not but if you did I see some holes which isnt bad at all my first videos(had a previous gaming channel and my second video got 22k views and had other success in my other videos just lost interest in games in general so stopped) weren't the best either But @Snowyamur I would say this I know your putting in the effort I see the 30 min long videos lots of them maybe try switching it up it takes a lot for a person to watch something that long, cut up the videos and focus on the more entertaining parts or parts you find interesting within the game maybe make more enticing thumbnails as well you have a good voice and your video quality is just as good as any big youtuber and as far as exposure for your channel to help grow well im looking for the same so no advice on that good luck.
When someone says "enticing thumbnails," I'm usually left in disbelief because there are so many shared videos and content on YouTube that get highly-consistent watch time and audience, but have some of the worst and poorly-designed thumbnails I have seen. Thumbnails only get one's foot in the door; they don't guarantee success, and when I think about how I design my thumbnails, I look for information, not enticement, because in the long-run, it helps for others to find your videos, especially the specific ones they're trying to look for, if they can recognize a thumbnail they've seen before and remember.

The thing with gaming channels, in general, is that they are very hard to grow. To me, that's no surprise. I've been a YouTube for only 2 months, but it doesn't take me that long to realize that people have interest in other things besides gaming. While the videogame industry itself is growing, the content supplied on social media outlets and sharing sites, such as YouTube, has become narrowed. What I mean by that is only the largest, most reputable, most known people and/ or content creators will gain more publicity for gaming content over smaller channels, like mine, because they set the foundation for their channel earlier and at a time when the birth of videogames was at its strongest, when gaming industries discovered more intuitive and innovative ways to design and develop games.

While you may not have as much advice for explosure @richard, I could provide some that may help in the long run. When it comes exposure, think of advertisement. Your YouTube channel grows the more it is advertised, the more known it is out there in the world, and the more people share about it. Exposure is about taking a chance at becoming known out there in the world and becoming a public figure that people could relate to, look to for help or guidance, or look to for the best entertainment around. The way I make my YouTube channel known is through social media, and while my YouTube channel hasn't grown as much as I hoped, I don't stop because as I continue working on how I advertise my channel, I gain experience and understanding as to what people want, and that's a life skill that aids in working and creating in favor of the people.

Anyways, that's all I have to say. Wishing you the best of luck with your channel as well @richard.
 
Last edited:

Shaun Carver

Newbie Member
TubeBuddy User
8
4
7
#18
I been making videos for about a year. Not as consistent as I should have been, but I don’t focus on the subs. I’m just try to make more and better content.
 
OP
OP
Snowyamur

Snowyamur

Newbie Member
109
39
9
#19
I been making videos for about a year. Not as consistent as I should have been, but I don’t focus on the subs. I’m just try to make more and better content.
That's good to hear, and I do that, too. However, having an audience that comments and critiques the content I make helps me to improve what I produce n' provide because that way, I can better cater towards the audience I desire to attract.
 
Likes: Damon