TubeBuddy What's your biggest struggle on YouTube?

Andrew

Superman
Administrator
5,653
31
youtube.com
Subscriber Goal
5000
For me I would say it's balancing upload frequencies, with content that takes a little longer. I've been getting better at it, by including live streams, and other pieces of content, but I want to know! What is your biggest struggle on YouTube?
 

Damon

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
1,068
21
www.blackwarriorlures.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
For me it's producing more high quality content. Since I got my GH4, I've wanted my fishing videos to be as close to NatGeo/BBC documentary quality as possible. That takes a long time. At that rate I can only get out about 1 video per week. I have plenty of how-to, tutorials and other quick-turn-around content to get out that I could churn out five days a week if I wanted. The balance for me now is 3 to 4 pieces of content per week with the big docu-style content about every two weeks.

I took an online class by Andrew St. Pierre White who is an overlander. He's one of these natural-borne Nation Geographic expedition-type guys. He goes on a six week expedition somewhere in the world just capturing footage. The whole expedition might only be 6 or 8 episodes, but the rest is how-to, vlogs, behind the scenes, or product review stuff. He doesn't produce the episodes until the expedition is over, and he's back home in the studio.

I've started thinking of my fishing trips like this. Although I don't travel, the time contrasts are the same because I'm trying to build a custom fishing tackle business.

So, well, I'm not sure what or if I'm asking anything, just blabbering. I figure schedule my trips around the full and new moon or around the particular story or experiment, then make short little 3 to 5 episode docu-style pieces of content out of them. Make a sort of TV show out of it right there on the channel.

My documentary fishing content gets the greatest numbers of views, greatest retention, greatest subscriber rates and everything. Even sales start coming in after I make one of those videos. The how-to video are necessary to show people how products work, to to give tips and advice, bu t the core of my channel has changed from primarily a how-to/tutorial based channel to primarily a documentary film channel.

Blanace. Where's the balance That's what I'm asking.
 
OP
OP
Andrew

Andrew

Superman
Administrator
5,653
31
youtube.com
Subscriber Goal
5000
For me it's producing more high quality content. Since I got my GH4, I've wanted my fishing videos to be as close to NatGeo/BBC documentary quality as possible. That takes a long time. At that rate I can only get out about 1 video per week. I have plenty of how-to, tutorials and other quick-turn-around content to get out that I could churn out five days a week if I wanted. The balance for me now is 3 to 4 pieces of content per week with the big docu-style content about every two weeks.

I took an online class by Andrew St. Pierre White who is an overlander. He's one of these natural-borne Nation Geographic expedition-type guys. He goes on a six week expedition somewhere in the world just capturing footage. The whole expedition might only be 6 or 8 episodes, but the rest is how-to, vlogs, behind the scenes, or product review stuff. He doesn't produce the episodes until the expedition is over, and he's back home in the studio.

I've started thinking of my fishing trips like this. Although I don't travel, the time contrasts are the same because I'm trying to build a custom fishing tackle business.

So, well, I'm not sure what or if I'm asking anything, just blabbering. I figure schedule my trips around the full and new moon or around the particular story or experiment, then make short little 3 to 5 episode docu-style pieces of content out of them. Make a sort of TV show out of it right there on the channel.

My documentary fishing content gets the greatest numbers of views, greatest retention, greatest subscriber rates and everything. Even sales start coming in after I make one of those videos. The how-to video are necessary to show people how products work, to to give tips and advice, bu t the core of my channel has changed from primarily a how-to/tutorial based channel to primarily a documentary film channel.

Blanace. Where's the balance That's what I'm asking.
I have a same struggle. My film content always does the best for me, but I know and understand it takes time. I would say the most important thing I learned from film school is that a film can be delayed and still be good, but a rushed film might be bad, and there is no saving it... LOOKING AT YOU BATMAN V SUPERMAN! haha

I would say focus on what makes you happy with the content, and experiment! It all matters :)
 
Damon - Hit the nail on the head. Its the production time that takes the longest. Getting the idea - making the story boards, filming, editing, etc. Since I am a one man crew I have been working on trying to automate as many tasks as possible.
 

EplxPro

New User
36
5
I would say Subscribers, but recently I've been looking more at my audience retention and how that audience got to my channel. I have 8.0K impressions, 4.3% YT recommending my content with a 1.1% click rate. I trying to find out how to get more people in and make them say.
 

xingcat

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Star
838
21
www.xingcat.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
Probably building my audience faster. I'm happy with where I am, but it's been fairly slow/steady growth for some time now, and I'd really like a couple of jumps up by a significant amount, just to see if the series' can catch on in a somewhat wide way. Maybe my content is more niche than that, but it'd be nice to know for sure.
 

Damon

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
1,068
21
www.blackwarriorlures.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
Xingcat, I think a lot of us in that greater than a 1,000, less than 10,000 are wanting and needing to see an order of magnitude growth, wanting the levies to "break" in a sense. For me this has been a flatline year, rather the growth is steady, but you wonder when is "it" gonna happen, or will "it" ever happen.

You know your content is good, you want to expand, but you want to know when are the flood gates are going to open? You have seen people with lesser content grow wildly, and it's like "what?" You've seen people with great content with nothing to show for it. It seems lopsided. You shrug your shoulders and plow on, but can't help but wonder if you're missing something.
 
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xingcat

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Star
838
21
www.xingcat.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
@Damon I think you're right. I think the days of, "Hit 1,000 subs and it goes faster" just don't happen quite the same way anymore, just because the platform is so expansive. I'm doing pretty well, will hit 5,000 fairly soon, but I think doing some strategic promotions outside of the traditional venues I've been using will be helpful.
 

Paul

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Legend
657
27
texturemaster.com
Subscriber Goal
5000
@Damon I think you're right. I think the days of, "Hit 1,000 subs and it goes faster" just don't happen quite the same way anymore, just because the platform is so expansive. I'm doing pretty well, will hit 5,000 fairly soon, but I think doing some strategic promotions outside of the traditional venues I've been using will be helpful.
Do you have a blog @xingcat? I get a lot of extra views and subscribers that I bring over to YouTube from my blog (google search). I pretty much just tell the video story, embed a video, have links to other videos and playlists with calls to action.
 

xingcat

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Star
838
21
www.xingcat.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
@Paul I do have a website where I repost my videos, but I haven't created standalone blog content in a while. Given that I have an entertainment channel that skews towards a younger set (we do puppetry and the videos are all kid-friendly, if not kid-focused), I tend to get a little confused about promotion strategies. It'd be easier for me if I had a how-to or a business channel, since I have seen a lot of great advice here (and elsewhere) about promotion.
 

Paul

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Legend
657
27
texturemaster.com
Subscriber Goal
5000
@Paul I do have a website where I repost my videos, but I haven't created standalone blog content in a while. Given that I have an entertainment channel that skews towards a younger set (we do puppetry and the videos are all kid-friendly, if not kid-focused), I tend to get a little confused about promotion strategies. It'd be easier for me if I had a how-to or a business channel, since I have seen a lot of great advice here (and elsewhere) about promotion.
Yes. But I think kids Mom's, Dad's, Grand Parent's, babysitter's ect... use Google search to figure out how to entertain the kids. Your Youtube videos can also show up at the top of google searches once the connection has been made to your blog.
The good thing is the only investment is your time! :cool:
 
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Andrew

Andrew

Superman
Administrator
5,653
31
youtube.com
Subscriber Goal
5000
Yes. But I think kids Mom's, Dad's, Grand Parent's, babysitter's ect... use Google search to figure out how to entertain the kids. Your Youtube videos can also show up at the top of google searches once the connection has been made to your blog.
The good thing is the only investment is your time! :cool:
Great insight, I have actually gotten A LOT of traction from my blog post about what to do at universal then I did my video, the views from the blog post are pretty great. I think it's worth considering!
 

Paul

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Legend
657
27
texturemaster.com
Subscriber Goal
5000
@Paul I do have a website where I repost my videos, but I haven't created standalone blog content in a while. Given that I have an entertainment channel that skews towards a younger set (we do puppetry and the videos are all kid-friendly, if not kid-focused), I tend to get a little confused about promotion strategies. It'd be easier for me if I had a how-to or a business channel, since I have seen a lot of great advice here (and elsewhere) about promotion.
I do watch your videos @xingcat. :>) My channel wasn't always a "How to" channel. I kind of adapted to what viewers were searching for. After doing some Googling I was thinking you could do some "How to" videos. Like "How to make a puppet" "How to make a dog puppet" "How to make a cat puppet" "How to make a diy puppet show" ect.. I would also recommend making character building playlist for kids and some series videos. These would be highly searchable terms.
 

Damon

Well-Known Member
TubeBuddy Pro
1,068
21
www.blackwarriorlures.com
Subscriber Goal
10000
Yeah, the how-to aspect adds a ton of search engine traction. Not only to mention that you could write your own puppeteering book and sell on Amazon Kindle or do an online class on any of the topics Paul listed. You could easily monetize this audience. You may never hit the big subscriber numbers, but monetizing can happen at any audience size

You could even sell puppet making kits. Some audiences don't buy information. For instance my audience of fishermen they just don't buy books and take classes, but they will buy fishing tackle. It's easy to import much of what you'd need from overseas and sell that on Amazon.

I'd rather have a small audience and really iron out the monetization side than to get a big audience and not have several ways to monetize. Remember Bob Ross the painter on PBS with the big fro? He was doing YouTube before YouTube was ever invented. Sure he'd paint his pictures on the PBS show, but he made a living selling paint supplies, books and stuff.
 

Ronnieleeeee

New User
TubeBuddy User
49
6
For me I’m not sure if it’s watch time or views. I know subscribers will come on their own so I’m not toooo worried about that. I just try to stay consistent with my uploads and hope that eventually my watch time and views get better over time
 

Ater

Newbie Member
TubeBuddy Pro
56
11
I have three big struggles:
I do two types of content on my channel. Content A and content B. I enjoy doing both types but I would prefer do focus on content A and just do content B every now and then when I have the time and the feel for it (content B is a lot more time consuming and I rarely have that amount of spare time). But my viewers prefer content B much more than content A, to the extent that content B videos often get 100 - 1000 times the views as my content A. I have considered stopping doing content A only focusing on B but that would result in very few videos getting released.

My content is focused on a niche that get a lot of attention once a year which means a lot of boom for my channel during a short period of time and a lot less during the rest of the year. As an example, during 2018 I got about 56% of all views and 48% of all new subs during less than 2.5 months. I have tried to change that this year by branching out to a new niche but it's always very time consuming and challenging to learn what you need to learn for a new niche and build up a new audience for that niche.

English is not my native language which means that I don't speak perfect English and sometimes I can struggle with finding the right words or mispronounce words and I can tell from my analytics and from other channels within my niche that it effects my channel.
 

Graceberr

New User
7
2
For me, I am a new you tuber and i don't have any idea on how to interact and promote my channel I might be doing everything wrong
 

Beanie Draws

Moderator
Moderator
Mine has always been, and continues to be consistency. The filming element is fine, it’s the editing that’s a struggle.

I seem to intimidate myself by seeing how long my raw footage is, and knowing with the amount of times needed to play through to make trims, it’s going to take significantly longer to actually edit the video. That usually freaks me out and gets me avoiding editing completely, so I’m trying to now learn methods and techniques to make editing more “fun” and time efficient, so I don’t put it off completely,
 

nyuyfoni

New User
5
4
The biggest problem for me at the moment is finding balance and staying consistent with it because sometimes i have videos that take days to edit because i have other things to tend to which is why i need to get my act together.